Connect with us

Technology

Consumer group that battles the big telcos blames CRTC for its ‘dire’ financial troubles

Published

on

[ad_1]

If you own a cellphone, use the internet or watch TV, your life has probably been affected by one of the most influential consumer advocacy organizations in the country — a group on the verge of shutting its doors for good.

For the past 42 years, the Public Interest Advocacy Centre [PIAC] has fought for better consumer protections from the telecom and broadcast industries.

But in a matter of weeks, PIAC says it will run out of money because the CRTC, the industry regulator the group so often prods, takes too long to compel the big telcos to pay the group for its work on behalf of consumers.

“We don’t exactly know why it’s taking so long to get paid,” PIAC executive director John Lawford told Go Public. “It’s a dire time right now.”

In a recent email to supporters, Lawford describes “an acute funding crunch” and says his organization will be unable to keep going without urgent help.

The CRTC has more than doubled the length of time it takes to order telecom companies to pay PIAC’s costs when it participates in regulatory issues. (Shutterstock)

The Ottawa-based advocacy organization recently moved to a smaller office to save money, and had to let two of its four staff members go.

But Lawford says that hasn’t been enough to stay afloat.

Where’s the money?

Most of PIAC’s budget comes from work the organization does at the CRTC.

“We go there as lawyers to argue for consumers,” Lawford said. “We try to get them lower prices and better service.”

When groups argue in the public interest before the CRTC, the regulator orders that the cost of that legal representation be paid by the companies involved — such as Bell Canada, Rogers, Telus and Netflix.

“It’s a regular regulatory cost for the companies,” Lawford said. “It’s an important check on their sort of full-speed-ahead efforts to get what they want from the CRTC. And it’s a small and very efficient price to pay to have consumer and public input on decisions that affect millions of Canadians.”

Lawford, second from right, testifies at the recent public hearing into sales tactics used by Canada’s largest telecom service providers. PIAC had urged the CRTC to hold the hearing. (CPAC)

He says over the past five years, the CRTC has more than doubled the length of time it takes to order telecom companies to pay those costs, from 3.7 months to 9.6 months. That’s simply too long to wait for funding, Lawford says.

PIAC is currently owed just over $150,000. The oldest outstanding claim was filed with the CRTC in July 2017.

“I think the CRTC has forgotten how it’s supposed to function,” Lawford said.

PIAC is also a registered charity and a non-profit organization, although its 2017 financial statement shows it received just $1,940 in donations.

Lawford bristles at the idea of asking the public to provide the organization’s funding.

“We’ve previously had a system that put the cost of this where it should lie,” he said. “Which is at the feet of the companies who are making billions and billions of dollars from consumers.”

CRTC will decide about payment ‘in due course’

Go Public asked the CRTC why it takes so long to make what’s called a “cost award” — calling on telecom companies to reimburse PIAC for its participation on consumer issues.

In an emailed response, spokesperson Patricia Valladao said it “depends on the complexity of the issues in each cost application.”

She also said the number of interveners applying for funding and the length of the proceeding can affect how quickly groups such as PIAC are paid. She said the regulator will make a decision about PIAC’s current application for payment “in due course.”

Consumer victories

PIAC opened in Ottawa in 1976, during the heyday of consumer activism in the U.S., led by Ralph Nader and his Public Interest Research Group.

Lawford joined PIAC in 2003. The idea of battling powerful telecom companies on behalf of consumers appealed to him.

“It was a chance to fight on a level playing field, if only for a moment,” he said. “And we got some big wins.”

PIAC was created in Canada in 1976, as Ralph Nader was leading the charge for consumer protections south of the border. (Jay Drowns/Associated Press)

In 2010, the CRTC ordered Bell Canada, Telus and other phone companies to refund every customer up to nearly $100 after overcharging for regular phone service. The rebate was the result of four years of hard work by PIAC and other consumer groups.

Lawford himself received one of those rebate cheques. It’s framed on his office wall — a memento of the fight that resulted in telcos having to refund $310 million.

The Wireless Code, a mandatory code of conduct for all wireless providers, was also hugely influenced by PIAC, Open Media and other consumer groups.

“So now there are rules about how long your wireless contract can be, and whether you can be charged when you’re roaming above a certain cap, and so on,” Lawford said. “These developments really helped consumers.”

Most recently, PIAC urged the CRTC to hold a public inquiry into misleading and aggressive sales practices used by the telcos.

PIAC called for the creation of the Commission for Complaints for Telecom-Television Services, a dispute mediator between telecom customers and their service providers. (Andrew Lee/CBC)

When the regulator refused, saying such an inquiry was not within its mandate, PIAC insisted that it was, and the federal government eventually ordered the CRTC to hold an inquiry. It is due to wrap up in February.

“Our role is to say, when consumers are having a problem that is actually affecting their bottom line in a big way… ‘As a regulator, you have to deal with it,'” Lawford said.

The group recently wrote a letter to Heritage Minister Pablo Rodriguez and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Minister Navdeep Bains urging them to contact the CRTC to help resolve the payment issues for groups like PIAC.

“We believe in your commitment to ensuring the CRTC carries out its public interest mandate and we request your assistance with this matter on an urgent basis,” wrote Harry Gow, chair of PIAC’s board of directors.

PIAC wrote a similar letter to government last year, which Lawford says prompted the regulator to order overdue costs be paid. But the delays are now worse, he says.

Go Public asked the federal government for its response to PIAC’s letter.

In an email, Dani Keenan, press secretary for Bains, said “officials are reaching out for a status update” and “will continue to monitor this situation closely.”

Hard time for consumer organizations

PIAC’s financial struggle is a reflection on the state of consumer advocacy in Canada, Lawford says.

“Broad-based consumer groups are now reduced to either being run by volunteers with only one paid staff,” he said, “or they are specialists like we are, who find a very small niche because that’s the only way to stay solvent.”

And even that “niche” approach may not save PIAC.

“It’s important to have somebody to just stick up their finger in a [telecom] hearing and say, ‘Excuse me, consumers think this.’ And that’s what we do,” Lawford said. “It’s just sad to see it go.”

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Technology

More groups join in support of women in STEM program at Carleton

Published

on

By

OTTAWA — Major companies and government partners are lending their support to Carleton University’s newly established Women in Engineering and Information Technology Program.

The list of supporters includes Mississauga-based construction company EllisDon.

The latest to announce their support for the program also include BlackBerry QNX, CIRA (Canadian Internet Registration Authority), Ericsson, Nokia, Solace, Trend Micro, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, CGI, Gastops, Leonardo DRS, Lockheed Martin Canada, Amdocs and Ross.

The program is officially set to launch this September.

It is being led by Carleton’s Faculty of Engineering and Design with the goal of establishing meaningful partnerships in support of women in STEM.  

The program will host events for women students to build relationships with industry and government partners, create mentorship opportunities, as well as establish a special fund to support allies at Carleton in meeting equity, diversity and inclusion goals.

Continue Reading

Technology

VR tech to revolutionize commercial driver training

Published

on

By

Serious Labs seems to have found a way from tragedy to triumph? The Edmonton-based firm designs and manufactures virtual reality simulators to standardize training programs for operators of heavy equipment such as aerial lifts, cranes, forklifts, and commercial trucks. These simulators enable operators to acquire and practice operational skills for the job safety and efficiency in a risk-free virtual environment so they can work more safely and efficiently.

The 2018 Humboldt bus catastrophe sent shock waves across the industry. The tragedy highlighted the need for standardized commercial driver training and testing. It also contributed to the acceleration of the federal government implementing a Mandatory Entry-Level Training (MELT) program for Class 1 & 2 drivers currently being adopted across Canada. MELT is a much more rigorous standard that promotes safety and in-depth practice for new drivers.

Enter Serious Labs. By proposing to harness the power of virtual reality (VR), Serious Labs has earned considerable funding to develop a VR commercial truck driving simulator.

The Government of Alberta has awarded $1 million, and Emissions Reduction Alberta (ERA) is contributing an additional $2 million for the simulator development. Commercial deployment is estimated to begin in 2024, with the simulator to be made available across Canada and the United States, and with the Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA) helping to provide simulator tests to certify that driver trainees have attained the appropriate standard. West Tech Report recently took the opportunity to chat with Serious Labs CEO, Jim Colvin, about the environmental and labour benefits of VR Driver Training, as well as the unique way that Colvin went from angel investor to CEO of the company.

Continue Reading

Technology

Next-Gen Tech Company Pops on New Cover Detection Test

Published

on

By

While the world comes out of the initial stages of the pandemic, COVID-19 will be continue to be a threat for some time to come. Companies, such as Zen Graphene, are working on ways to detect the virus and its variants and are on the forefronts of technology.

Nanotechnology firm ZEN Graphene Solutions Ltd. (TSX-Venture:ZEN) (OTCPK:ZENYF), is working to develop technology to help detect the COVID-19 virus and its variants. The firm signed an exclusive agreement with McMaster University to be the global commercializing partner for a newly developed aptamer-based, SARS-CoV-2 rapid detection technology.

This patent-pending technology uses clinical samples from patients and was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The test is considered extremely accurate, scalable, saliva-based, affordable, and provides results in under 10 minutes.

Shares were trading up over 5% to $3.07 in early afternoon trade.

Continue Reading

Trending