Connect with us

Headlines

‘Mad dog’ bites Trump – Macleans.ca

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Welcome to a sneak peek of the Maclean’s Politics Insider newsletter. Sign-up at the bottom of the page to get it delivered straight to your inbox.

Term limits: The improbable rise of Rachel Notley‘s NDP in Canada’s conservative heartland faces long odds in a spring election. Jason Markusoff looks at whether Notley’s government be the first in Alberta history to only win one term:

For the NDP, this Alberta election won’t be the national project the last one was. In 2015, heavyweights from the Manitoba government and the Layton and Thomas Mulcair camps flew in for a training run. This time, federal leader Jagmeet Singh’s camp is threadbare, while the only other New Democrat government is John Horgan’s in Victoria, which Notley banned her team from helping during B.C.’s last campaign due to the Horgan NDP’s anti-pipeline stance. Trudeau’s Liberals would love to retain Notley as a provincial ally, but as much as Kenney is treating Trudeau like a campaign punching bag (an old Alberta pastime), he would be doing Notley no favours by punching back. For an Alberta New Democrat these days, getting help from the federal Liberals is about as politically appealing as buddying up to the B.C. NDP—like choosing between drinking bleach and ammonia. (Maclean’s)

With Albertans booing local politicians when they speak French and threatening to boycott Quebec companies and products, Alec Castonguay, the political bureau chief for L’Actualité, pens an open letter to the province, providing some details that have gotten lost in the angry rhetoric—like the fact that 53 per cent of Quebec’s oil comes from the West, and that not a drop of oil in the province comes from Saudi Arabia. (Maclean’s)

U.S. authorities accused two Chinese citizens of waging a four-year hacking campaign against government agencies, members of the military and private companies from a dozen countries, including Canada, on behalf of China’s main intelligence agency. Canada’s Communications Security Establishment said in a statement “it is almost certain that actors likely associated with the People’s Republic of China (PRC) Ministry of State Security (MSS) are responsible for the compromise of several Managed Service Providers (MSP), beginning as early as 2016. (Canadian Press)

No, no, a thousand times, no: For the second time in less than a decade B.C. voters were asked to embrace proportional representation, and for the second time they said no. Just 16 of B.C.’s 87 electoral districts supported the electoral reform initiative in a referendum on Thursday. (Vancouver Sun)

Jim ‘Mad Dog’ Mattis resigned as U.S. Defense Secretary Thursday evening, a day after Donald Trump blindsided his advisers and America’s allies by announcing the withdrawal of troops from Syria. Trump tried to spin Mattis’s departure as a retirement on Twitter, but the former General’s resignation letter makes it clear he’d had enough:

My views on treating allies with respect and also being clear-eyed about both malign actors and strategic competitors are strongly held and informed by over four decades of immersion in these issues. We must do everything possible to advance an international order that is most conducive to our security, prosperity and values, and we are strengthened in this effort by the solidarity of our alliances.

Because you have the right to a Secretary of Defense whose views are better aligned with yours on these and other subjects, I believe it is right for me to step down from my position. (The Atlantic)

Two years after his election, Trump is proving his personal creed that power is everything—and damn the cost to his country, writes Allen Abel:

Christmas 2018 finds us Halfway Trump, rounding the turn and heading for home with the finish line in sight in January 2021, give or take a year or three or five. Twenty-four months of astonishment fade behind us; only the saints know how many more we must sustain before, in the words of Abraham Lincoln’s Secretary of War, he belongs to the ages.

As far as we know, Lincoln’s Secretary of War never called his president a moron. (Maclean’s)

Dear reader, that’s all from us in 2018. Thank you for generously giving the Politics Insider newsletter your time and attention this year. We appreciate it immensely, and hope that in some small way we’ve informed and entertained you. The newsletter is going to take a break over Christmas and New Year’s. We’ll return bright and early on Jan. 7. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Headlines

‘Too soon to celebrate’ Ottawa’s low case count, says Etches

Editor

Published

on

By

Ottawa Public Health (OPH) logged just 11 new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday, the lowest daily total since Sept. 1.

Because of the lag between testing and reporting, the low number could simply reflect low turnout at the city’s testing sites on weekends — all month, new case counts have been lower on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. 

During a virtual news conference Tuesday, the city’s medical officer of health Dr. Vera Etches said she doesn’t read too much into a single day’s report.

“I don’t think we can make too much of 11. Actually, it could be a lot higher tomorrow — I would expect that, on average,” she said. “It’s too soon to celebrate.”

Provincewide, public health officials reported 1, 249 new cases Tuesday.

OPH also declared 62 cases resolved Tuesday, lowering the number of known active cases in the city to 462. Two more people have died, both in care homes currently experiencing outbreaks, raising the city’s COVID-19 death toll to 361. 

Continue Reading

Headlines

Santa Claus isn’t coming to Ottawa’s major malls this year

Editor

Published

on

By

Santa Claus may still be coming to town this Christmas, but he won’t be dropping by any of Ottawa’s major malls, thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic.

On Friday, Cadillac Fairview said Santa won’t be making an appearance at any of its 19 malls across Canada, including Rideau Centre in downtown Ottawa. On Tuesday, Bayshore and St. Laurent shopping centres confirmed they, too, are scrapping the annual tradition.

“Due to the evolution of the situation in regards to COVID-19, we have made the difficult decision to cancel our Santa Program and Gift Wrap Program this year,” Bayshore spokesperson Sara Macdonald wrote in an email to CBC.

Macdonald said parent company Ivanhoé Cambridge cancelled all holiday activities “due to the rising number of COVID-19 cases across the country.”

Macdonald said families that had already booked an appointment to visit Santa will receive an email with more information.  

Virtual visits with Santa

Rideau Centre said based on customer research and discussions with public health officials, its North Pole is going online this year.

“Children will be able to have a private chat with Santa,” said Craig Flannagan, vice-president of marketing for Cadillac Fairview. “You’ll also be able to join a 15-minute storytime with Santa over Facebook Live.” 

At Place d’Orléans Shopping Centre, visitors are invited to take a “selfie with Santa” — actually, a life-size cutout of Santa Pierre, the man who’s been playing Santa at the east end mall for years.

“We understand that this is not ideal, but in lieu of this tradition we will be doing what we can to maintain and encourage holiday cheer,” according to a statement on the mall’s Facebook page.

Continue Reading

Headlines

Ottawa Bylaw breaks up two large parties in Ottawa over the weekend

Editor

Published

on

By

OTTAWA — Ottawa Bylaw is investigating social gatherings of more than 10 people in private homes across Ottawa last weekend.

Mayor Jim Watson tells Newstalk 580 CFRA that Ottawa Bylaw broke-up two house parties over the weekend, with 20 to 25 people at each party.

“That’s the kind of stupidity that angers me, that’s where the bulk of the transmissions are taking place, if we exclude the tragedy of the long-term care homes; it’s these house parties with unrelated people,” said Watson on Newstalk 580 CFRA’s Ottawa at Work with Leslie Roberts.

“The message doesn’t seem to be getting through, particularly to some young people who think they’re invincible.”

In a statement to CTV News Ottawa, Bylaw and Regulatory Services Director Roger Chapman says, “There are still ongoing investigations from this past weekend that could result in charges.”

Chapman says recent investigations led to two charges being issued for social gatherings of more than 10 people in a private residence in contravention of the Reopening Ontario Act.

“In one case, up to 30 individuals were observed attending a house party in Ward 18 on Oct. 24,” said Chapman.

“The second charge was issued following a house party in Ward 16 on Oct. 31, where up to 16 individuals were observed to be in attendance.”

The fine is $880 for hosting an illegal gathering.

Alta Vista is Ward 18, while Ward 16 is River Ward.

Ottawa Bylaw has issued 24 charges for illegal gatherings since the start of the pandemic.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending