Connect with us

Buzz

Sisi’s call on Egyptians to lose weight creates a stir | Egypt News

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Egypt’s President Abdel Fattah El-Sisi is being criticised for calling on his compatriots to lose weight.

In televised comments earlier this month, the general-turned-president railed about the number of overweight people he sees and told Egyptians that they must take better care of themselves.

Sisi said physical education should become part of the core curriculum at schools and universities and suggested TV shows should not let presenters or guests on the air if they are overweight.






Egypt coup: Five years since Sisi took power

“The second I walk into any place I look at things you cannot possibly imagine I would notice and I ask myself – ‘What is this? Who are these people? Why are these people not looking after themselves?” Sisi said on December 15.

Sisi’s critics said he was fat-shaming and taking an elitist approach to a problem whose roots lie to a large extent in poverty.

They also criticised him for not offering concrete plans to combat obesity and spread fitness.

Mohamed Zaree, a rights lawyer, said Sisi needs to enable Egyptians to lose weight rather than ordering them to exercise.

“He needs to make healthy food available at low prices, set up venues where people can exercise and allow emergency obesity operations to be performed under the cover of the state’s medical care system,” Zaree said.

Rising prices

Prices for food – particularly fruits and vegetables – have spiraled because of economic reforms introduced by Sisi, often making cheaper junk foods more appealing.

No one disputes that Egypt has a weight problem. One in three Egyptians suffers from obesity, the world’s highest rate, according to a 2017 global study by the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

It found 35 percent of adults – some 19 million people in the country of 100 million – are obese, again the world’s highest rate, as well as 10.2 percent of Egyptian children, or around 3.6 million.






Egypt’s government targeting journalists in media crackdown

Egypt’s pro-government media trumpeted his comments. Parliament, packed by his supporters, has said it intends to introduce legislation making physical education part of the core curriculum at schools.

In social media, possibly the only platform of relatively free speech left in Egypt, the response was more critical. Some said Sisi was removed from reality.

A flood of jokes spilled forth on Twitter and Facebook, playing on the risks of being too fat under a president whose security forces have arrested thousands in a widespread crackdown against dissent.

One joke that went viral showed people in a car sucking in their bellies as they approached a police checkpoint.

Another has a man asking to hide at a friend’s house from police until he loses weight. In another, a man informs on his overweight wife to authorities on the phone.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Buzz

Driver in satisfactory condition following head-on Gatineau collision

Editor

Published

on

By

One person was in hospital in satisfactory condition following a head-on collision between two vehicles in Gatineau on Saturday.

According to Gatineau police, the crash occurred around 1:30 p.m. on Montée Paiement, between Saint-Thomas and Saint-Columban roads.

Each of the vehicles had only one occupant at the time of the incident.

Continue Reading

Buzz

Ottawa military family alleges bad faith eviction by Saudi Arabia’s top diplomat in Canada

Editor

Published

on

By

An Ottawa military family alleges their former landlord — Saudi Arabia’s top diplomat in Canada — acted in bad faith when he gave them a notice of eviction, claiming he intended to move into their Vanier rental home with his own family.

The home is now listed for sale for $950,000, two months after Vivian and Tim Funk moved out with their two young children.

In documents filed with the Landlord and Tenant Board, the Funks detailed how their landlord, Sulaiman AlAqeel, acted to end their tenancy by allegedly pretending he was moving in himself. This was preceded by an attempt to market the house to new tenants for significantly more money when the Funks had not given notice indicating they would be leaving, the documents alleged. “The landlord’s representative,” according to the documents, allegedly told the Funks they needed to accept a $500 monthly rent increase and a new lease if they wanted to continue living in the rental property, which wouldn’t be legal under the Residential Tenancies Act.

Continue Reading

Buzz

Ottawa COVID-19 hospitalization data showing half of cases coming from community, not just long-term care

Editor

Published

on

By

With local data showing 50 per cent of COVID-19 hospitalizations coming from the community, long-term care residents aren’t the only one vulnerable to severe illness from the virus, Ottawa’s Board of Health reports.

Despite the majority of deaths having happened in older adult age groups in long-term care homes, residents shouldn’t think institutions are the only settings that are vulnerable to outbreaks that lead to serious illness from the virus.

“[Ottawa Public Health] continues to expand our understanding of the types of settings and situations that have the most impact on COVID-19 transmission in our community and is seeking academic partners to better explore exposure risks as well as a broader assessment of the harms from different public health measures,” OPH outlined in its document, to be present at the Board of Health on Monday.

At the same time, however, OPH says it is working closely with partners on “processes to strengthen and streamline responses.” This includes weekly meetings across agencies to address issues and concerns to ensure a strong collaboration, ongoing communications with facilities, preventative visits and phone calls to review infection prevention and control.

In situations where OPH identified failings at an LTCH or concerns of compliance have been raised, OPH has been quick to issue letters of expectation that outline the deficiencies and timelines fo compliance.

It is unclear how many letters have been issued through both waves of the virus.

And while outbreaks in LTCH during wave two have recorded a higher number of LTCH outbreaks than in wave one, the overall morbidity and mortality has been lower. This means fewer cases, fewer deaths and a lower average duration of outbreaks.

OPH contributed this to building on lessons learned from early COVID-19 outbreaks in LTCH in Ottawa.

https://www.ottawamatters.com/local-news/ottawa-covid-19-hospitalization-data-of-severe-illness-shows-half-of-cases-coming-from-community-not-just-long-term-care-homes-3136152

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending