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MH370 news latest: Debris thought to be from missing Malaysia Airlines plane VANISHED | Weird | News

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MH370 went missing on March 8 2014 en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 people on board. The area investigators believed the plane may have crashed was in the middle of the Indian Ocean, which is very remote and difficult to access. It would take ships days to reach their destination and land-based aircraft would have to fly for several hours from the Australian mainland just to begin searching.

However, time was of the essence so surveillance satellites began to look straight away.

One satellite image revealed what appeared to be a scattering of debris in the area being investigated.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said in front of parliament on March 19 of the same year that it represented “new and credible” information about the fate of MH370.

However, when ships and planes followed up on this lead they could not find any debris.

Jeff Wise, author of The Plane That Wasn’t There, explained how this then happened over and over.

He said: “Day by day, more new reports of debris came filtering in.

“None of them panned out. This was very strange.

“Planes had gone missing in the middle of the ocean before, but they had always left behind telltale floating debris.”

By this point, more than a week had already elapsed since the plane went missing.

If the plane had gone into the ocean, currents would be dispersing the debris further and further away every day, making it harder to locate.

The further debris drifted away, the harder it would be to figure out where the plane impacted the sea.

This was crucial, because directly underneath this spot would lie the heavier parts of the aeroplane, including the black box that could unravel the mystery.

Debris believed to be from MH370 has since been found washed up in various locations around the Indian Ocean, mostly on the east coast of Africa.

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Driver in satisfactory condition following head-on Gatineau collision

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One person was in hospital in satisfactory condition following a head-on collision between two vehicles in Gatineau on Saturday.

According to Gatineau police, the crash occurred around 1:30 p.m. on Montée Paiement, between Saint-Thomas and Saint-Columban roads.

Each of the vehicles had only one occupant at the time of the incident.

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Ottawa military family alleges bad faith eviction by Saudi Arabia’s top diplomat in Canada

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An Ottawa military family alleges their former landlord — Saudi Arabia’s top diplomat in Canada — acted in bad faith when he gave them a notice of eviction, claiming he intended to move into their Vanier rental home with his own family.

The home is now listed for sale for $950,000, two months after Vivian and Tim Funk moved out with their two young children.

In documents filed with the Landlord and Tenant Board, the Funks detailed how their landlord, Sulaiman AlAqeel, acted to end their tenancy by allegedly pretending he was moving in himself. This was preceded by an attempt to market the house to new tenants for significantly more money when the Funks had not given notice indicating they would be leaving, the documents alleged. “The landlord’s representative,” according to the documents, allegedly told the Funks they needed to accept a $500 monthly rent increase and a new lease if they wanted to continue living in the rental property, which wouldn’t be legal under the Residential Tenancies Act.

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Ottawa COVID-19 hospitalization data showing half of cases coming from community, not just long-term care

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With local data showing 50 per cent of COVID-19 hospitalizations coming from the community, long-term care residents aren’t the only one vulnerable to severe illness from the virus, Ottawa’s Board of Health reports.

Despite the majority of deaths having happened in older adult age groups in long-term care homes, residents shouldn’t think institutions are the only settings that are vulnerable to outbreaks that lead to serious illness from the virus.

“[Ottawa Public Health] continues to expand our understanding of the types of settings and situations that have the most impact on COVID-19 transmission in our community and is seeking academic partners to better explore exposure risks as well as a broader assessment of the harms from different public health measures,” OPH outlined in its document, to be present at the Board of Health on Monday.

At the same time, however, OPH says it is working closely with partners on “processes to strengthen and streamline responses.” This includes weekly meetings across agencies to address issues and concerns to ensure a strong collaboration, ongoing communications with facilities, preventative visits and phone calls to review infection prevention and control.

In situations where OPH identified failings at an LTCH or concerns of compliance have been raised, OPH has been quick to issue letters of expectation that outline the deficiencies and timelines fo compliance.

It is unclear how many letters have been issued through both waves of the virus.

And while outbreaks in LTCH during wave two have recorded a higher number of LTCH outbreaks than in wave one, the overall morbidity and mortality has been lower. This means fewer cases, fewer deaths and a lower average duration of outbreaks.

OPH contributed this to building on lessons learned from early COVID-19 outbreaks in LTCH in Ottawa.

https://www.ottawamatters.com/local-news/ottawa-covid-19-hospitalization-data-of-severe-illness-shows-half-of-cases-coming-from-community-not-just-long-term-care-homes-3136152

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