Connect with us

Technology

The Week in Tech: A Peek at the Year Ahead

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Each week, technology reporters and columnists from The New York Times review the week’s news, offering analysis and maybe a joke or two about the most important developments in the tech industry. Want this newsletter in your inbox? Sign up here.

Hello! I’m Nellie Bowles, the Silicon Valley and tech culture reporter at The Times, now with the privilege of bringing you the last tech newsletter of 2018.

Readers of this letter know all too well what happened in tech news this year. We had some good times (crypto!), but mostly the headlines from Silicon Valley were dire revelations about corporate power, violations of consumer trust and platform-led disinformation.

Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, even finished the year with a product mishap: It accidentally released horizontal scrolling to horrified users, Sandra E. Garcia and Niraj Chokshi reported.

I’m not going to pretend 2019 will be free of Facebook news, but a new set of stories are going hit this newsletter.

The year looks as if it’s going to be a Silicon Valley I.P.O.-palooza.

Uber, Airbnb, Lyft, Palantir and Pinterest are all angling to go public in 2019, despite the recent stock market swoon. Cash, locked up in stock options, is about to flood the region, and fleets of new millionaires will be roving.

It’ll be a boom, except San Francisco never really had a bust. So it’ll just be more. The housing market will be strained. More. Restaurants will open. Or reopen. And the city will have another chance to funnel these gains into infrastructure.

Finally, this generation of start-ups, some still losing large amounts of money, will see how they can fare under the scrutiny of public markets. Will public investors be less forgiving than the venture-investing counterparts of unprofitable companies?

We’ll be there to cover all of it.

Now for the week’s stories:

■ Vindu Goel told how Amazon and Walmart might find themselves under strict new Indian laws against offering discounts, exclusive products or products supplied by affiliated companies on their Indian shopping sites.

■ The Federal Trade Commission is looking into how Facebook handles personal information, my colleague Natasha Singer reported. In 2011, the commission accused the company of deceptive privacy practices. And in light of the past year’s near-constant news about Facebook’s betraying consumer privacy, it looks as if it might be back in hot water.

■ I wrote about how the online payments platform Patreon is working to enforce its rules against hate speech, causing a small revolt among its user base. And I followed up on my blockchain reporting from earlier this year with a somber foray into Crypto Winter.

■ The artificial intelligence that became better at chess than any human or computer has ever been has now been thoroughly studied. Scientists have concluded that it did indeed show an intellect humans hadn’t seen before, wrote Steven Strogatz, a mathematics professor at Cornell. And in his beautiful essay, he explored what that means.

■ Brian X. Chen managed to find two tech products that got better in 2018. Which ones? Smartphone parental controls like screen time limits and the privacy-focused browser Firefox.

■ And Daniel Victor brought us back to our brief moments of communal joy and laughter with five fun 2018 memes. Did you know Yanny vs. Laurel was this year? (I literally have gone gray since then.)

■ Finally, the investigative reporter Matt Apuzzo wrote about his personal tech use. He travels with burner laptops and for the really sensitive interviews will never type the notes digitally anywhere. He has also been off Twitter for two years, he added, leaving us with the week’s best kicker.

“I’m still there as @mattapuzzo, though, because a colleague told me that if I deleted the account it would be taken over by sex bots. And nobody wants that.”

See you all in 2019. May none of your accounts be overtaken by sex bots.

Nellie Bowles writes about Silicon Valley and tech culture for The New York Times in The Times’s bureau in her hometown, San Francisco. You can follow her on Twitter here: @NellieBowles.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Technology

More groups join in support of women in STEM program at Carleton

Editor

Published

on

By

OTTAWA — Major companies and government partners are lending their support to Carleton University’s newly established Women in Engineering and Information Technology Program.

The list of supporters includes Mississauga-based construction company EllisDon.

The latest to announce their support for the program also include BlackBerry QNX, CIRA (Canadian Internet Registration Authority), Ericsson, Nokia, Solace, Trend Micro, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, CGI, Gastops, Leonardo DRS, Lockheed Martin Canada, Amdocs and Ross.

The program is officially set to launch this September.

It is being led by Carleton’s Faculty of Engineering and Design with the goal of establishing meaningful partnerships in support of women in STEM.  

The program will host events for women students to build relationships with industry and government partners, create mentorship opportunities, as well as establish a special fund to support allies at Carleton in meeting equity, diversity and inclusion goals.

Continue Reading

Technology

VR tech to revolutionize commercial driver training

Editor

Published

on

By

Serious Labs seems to have found a way from tragedy to triumph? The Edmonton-based firm designs and manufactures virtual reality simulators to standardize training programs for operators of heavy equipment such as aerial lifts, cranes, forklifts, and commercial trucks. These simulators enable operators to acquire and practice operational skills for the job safety and efficiency in a risk-free virtual environment so they can work more safely and efficiently.

The 2018 Humboldt bus catastrophe sent shock waves across the industry. The tragedy highlighted the need for standardized commercial driver training and testing. It also contributed to the acceleration of the federal government implementing a Mandatory Entry-Level Training (MELT) program for Class 1 & 2 drivers currently being adopted across Canada. MELT is a much more rigorous standard that promotes safety and in-depth practice for new drivers.

Enter Serious Labs. By proposing to harness the power of virtual reality (VR), Serious Labs has earned considerable funding to develop a VR commercial truck driving simulator.

The Government of Alberta has awarded $1 million, and Emissions Reduction Alberta (ERA) is contributing an additional $2 million for the simulator development. Commercial deployment is estimated to begin in 2024, with the simulator to be made available across Canada and the United States, and with the Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA) helping to provide simulator tests to certify that driver trainees have attained the appropriate standard. West Tech Report recently took the opportunity to chat with Serious Labs CEO, Jim Colvin, about the environmental and labour benefits of VR Driver Training, as well as the unique way that Colvin went from angel investor to CEO of the company.

Continue Reading

Technology

Next-Gen Tech Company Pops on New Cover Detection Test

Editor

Published

on

By

While the world comes out of the initial stages of the pandemic, COVID-19 will be continue to be a threat for some time to come. Companies, such as Zen Graphene, are working on ways to detect the virus and its variants and are on the forefronts of technology.

Nanotechnology firm ZEN Graphene Solutions Ltd. (TSX-Venture:ZEN) (OTCPK:ZENYF), is working to develop technology to help detect the COVID-19 virus and its variants. The firm signed an exclusive agreement with McMaster University to be the global commercializing partner for a newly developed aptamer-based, SARS-CoV-2 rapid detection technology.

This patent-pending technology uses clinical samples from patients and was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The test is considered extremely accurate, scalable, saliva-based, affordable, and provides results in under 10 minutes.

Shares were trading up over 5% to $3.07 in early afternoon trade.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending