Connect with us

LIFESTYLES

Yeet! List says ban ‘optics,’ ‘thought leader,’ ‘collusion’

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Jeff Karoub, The Associated Press


Published Monday, December 31, 2018 12:41AM EST

DETROIT — No collusion! (Or at least a lot less of it.)

That’s according to a Michigan school’s latest “List of Words Banished from the Queen’s English for Mis-use, Over-use and General Uselessness.”

The politically charged term at the centre of special prosecutor Robert Mueller’s investigation into whether President Donald Trump’s campaign co-ordinated with Russia is among 18 entries on Lake Superior State University’s 44th annual list, which was released Monday.

University spokesman John Shibley said the school received about 3,000 votes through its website and Facebook pages. Although Trump has repeatedly tweeted that there was “no collusion” and “collusion” was among the top-three vote-getters — along with “wheelhouse and “in the books” — its inclusion should not be interpreted as a political statement by the list-makers. Rather, voters apparently were just irritated by hearing and reading the word so often in the past year, he said.

“I can usually read a political nomination when I see it,” he said. “If I saw a string of trolls trying to pack the ballot box for political reasons, I would have caught it.”

The other words or expressions to make the list are “wrap my head around,” “grapple,” “optics,” “eschew” and “thought leader.” Also submitted by the public for the pyre of popular parlance: “platform,” “ghosting,” “yeet,” “litigate,” “crusty,” “legally drunk,” “importantly” and “accoutrements.”

Two other political entries also made it: “Most important election of our time” and “OTUS” acronyms such as POTUS — for President of the United States. The acronyms that have found their way onto cable news shows date back to the late 19th century, when POTUS and SCOTUS (Supreme Court of the United States) were used as telegraph codes, according to Merriam-Webster. FLOTUS, for the first lady, first appeared in the 1980s.

Among the newest terms — yet one the curators feel has outlived its usefulness — is “yeet,” which variously refers to the name of a dance, a taunt, an excited acknowledgement or throwing something. Other words are commonly known in one setting, such as “litigate” among lawyers, but get trotted out by some politicians and pundits for hashing out “any matter of controversy,” according to one submission.

The list is meant to be in fun, but it’s bound to raise some hackles.

There was a “whiff” of legal concern back in 1994, when officials from the Los Angeles Lakers objected to the list’s inclusion of “three-peat,” Shibley said. The team’s coach at the time, Hall of Famer Pat Riley, owned the trademark. Eventually, the team officials dropped their objections after determining that its inclusion on the list wasn’t “commercially flagrant.”

Some members of the public were upset at the 2002 inclusion of “9-11,” which received thousands of votes for banishment, Shibley said. It was deemed by nominators as “too much (of) a shorthand” for the tragic terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but people misunderstood and thought the school was “thumbing our noses at 9-11,” he said.

Shibley said that with the rise of social media and ever-more-divisive politics, people have even “shorter fuses,” which means he and his colleagues tread carefully. After all, the aim of the list isn’t to inflame but to entertain.

“Hopefully (it) helps diffuse some of the animus out there — not by laughing at ourselves, but by laughing at how language sometimes backs us into some absurdly funny corners,” he said.

There’s no overlap between this year’s list and 2018 word-of-the-year pronouncements by Merriam-Webster (“justice”) and Oxford Dictionaries (“toxic”). Still, the Michigan school did ban “toxic assets” in 2010 and “bring them to justice” or “bring the evil-doers to justice” in 2010.

Another Michigan school takes the opposite approach: Detroit’s Wayne State University attempts through its Word Warriors campaign to exhume worthy words that have fallen out of favour. This year’s list included “couth,” “compunction,” and “nugatory,” which doesn’t describe the creamy candy confection known as nougat but means “no value or importance.”

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

LIFESTYLES

Ottawa families give mixed reviews for online schooling

Editor

Published

on

By

So, how’s it going with online school? Families reached by CBC Ottawa seem to have mixed reviews. 

Masuma Khan is a mother of two. Her seven-year-old, Hana Wyndham in Grade 2, is attending French immersion virtual school. Masuma is grateful it’s an option, but can’t help notice a lot of down time.

“There’s a lot of, ‘are you on mute?’ In terms of the amount of learning that’s actually happening, it does seem to be not that high,” said Masuma.

Parents who kept their children at home this fall are in the minority, but they still form a significant chunk of families in Ottawa.

In the city’s largest school board, the Ottawa-Carleton District School Board (OCDSB), about 27 per cent of elementary students and 22 per cent of high school students chose online learning. The Ottawa Catholic School Board says roughly a quarter of its students are online.

Continue Reading

LIFESTYLES

Top environment official urges Canadians to back Ottawa’s ambitious plans to tackle plastic trash

Editor

Published

on

By

The second in command at the federal Environment Ministry challenged Canadians to continue to speak up about the problem of plastic pollution and push elected officials, scientists and businesses to do more.

Quebec MP Peter Schiefke, parliamentary secretary to the minister of Environment and Climate Change Canada, made the comments online at Vancouver’s annual zero waste conference on Friday.

He said most Canadians want solutions to curb the tens of thousands of tonnes of plastic garbage that ends up as litter each year on the country’s beaches, parks, lakes and in the stomachs of animals. 

“Making sure that message is heard with industry stakeholders, elected officials and make sure that they are constantly putting pressure on it … so we notice that this is something that Canadians want, the backing of Canadians to go and undertake these huge challenges,” he said.

Schiefke filled in for  Environment Minister Jonathan Wilkinson at the last minute after Wilkinson was called away to meet with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

Continue Reading

LIFESTYLES

OC Transpo’s monthly bus pass one of the most expensive fares in Canada

Editor

Published

on

By

OTTAWA — OC Transpo’s monthly bus pass is one of the most expensive passes in Canada, and transit riders are facing another 2.5 per cent hike in transit fares on New Year’s Day.

Ahead of Wednesday’s Transit Commission meeting on the 2021 budget, CTV News Ottawa looked at the cost of a monthly adult bus pass at transit services across Canada. Ottawa ranks behind the TTC in Toronto, Mississauga’s “MiWay”, Brampton Transit and Vancouver “TransLink” Zone 2 access to the suburbs for most expensive transit fares in Canada.

The cost of an OC Transpo adult monthly bus pass is currently $119.50 a month.

The 2021 City of Ottawa budget includes a proposed 2.5 per cent hike in transit fares. If approved, an adult monthly transit pass will increase $3 to $122.50, while a youth pass will increase $2.25 to $94.50 a month.  The cost of an adult single-ride cash fare would rise a nickel to $3.65.

The TTC is the most expensive transit service in Canada, charging $156 a month for an adult fare. MiWay charges $135 a month, and the cost of an adult monthly pass with Brampton Transit is $128.

Metro Vancouver’s transportation network “TransLink” has three fare zones. The monthly bus pass cost for “Zone 1”, which covers Vancouver, is $97 for adults. The “Zone 2” fare, which covers Vancouver and the suburbs of Richmond and Burnaby, is $131 a month.

Edmonton Transit Service, which includes a Light Rail System with 18 stations on two different lines, charges $97 a month for an adult monthly bus pass.

An adult monthly bus pass in Calgary costs $109 a month.

The survey by CTV News Ottawa of transit fares across Canada shows Gatineau has higher transit fares than Montreal and Quebec City. The STO charges $99 a month.

A monthly adult bus pass costs $88.50 in Montreal and $89.50 in Quebec City.

The cheapest adult monthly bus fare is in Charlottetown, at $58.50 a month. A monthly bus pass in Whitehorse costs $62 a month.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending