Connect with us

Health

Want to start an Ayurvedic diet? Here are some tips on how to begin – NaturalNews.com

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]



























Image: Want to start an Ayurvedic diet? Here are some tips on how to begin

(Natural News)
The ancient Indian healing art of Ayurveda roughly translates to “the science of life.” An Ayurvedic diet follows the principles of Ayurveda to help people achieve balance in their overall health and well-being. It’s not just about what you eat, but your entire manner of eating. Eating isn’t merely considered a form of physical nourishment, but also as an experience in itself. Trying an Ayurvedic diet might sound difficult, but there are a few easy tips to help you get started.

Ayurveda more closely resembles a lifestyle choice. An Ayurvedic diet is a bit more complicated than a regular Paleo or vegan diet. There are no hard and fast rules on what you can and can’t eat. Instead, an Ayurvedic diet is personalized to better meet an individual’s needs. A primary characteristic of the diet is that you eat according to your “dosha.” Doshas are the three main forces that can affect your mental, spiritual, and physical health. Your dosha is your dominant force. Eating according to your own dosha can make you feel your best and possibly help prevent disease. (Related: Feeling constipated? Try this ancient Ayurvedic herbal remedy to improve digestion.)

Helpful tips on starting a Ayurvedic diet

  • Know your dosha. The three Ayurvedic doshas are Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. Vatas tend to be creative, intense, or expressive. Pittas are often considered intelligent, joyful, and driven. The characteristics associated with Kaphas are being calm, loving, or lethargic. It is good to know your dosha, but you don’t have to be limited by it. It is not an end-all, be-all of an Ayurvedic diet. Other factors to consider are your age and how certain foods make you feel.
  • Make eating an experience. Don’t just eat to satisfy hunger. Eat to fully appreciate the food before you. Eat with your loved ones to sustain strong social connections. Eat slowly to savor the taste of the food but not too much that your food gets cold. Avoid other distractions and focus on the meal. You should be able to eat mindfully and with concentration.
  • Incorporate the six rasas into your meals. The six rasas or tastes are sweet, salty, sour, bitter, pungent and astringent. By embracing a variety of flavors, you can satisfy all your different cravings. Traditional Ayurvedic meals often begin with a sweet fruit, followed by a salty seafood dish. You can then eat a sour citrus fruit and end with a meal that has pungent onions or peppers, and bitter celery or kale. Finish off your meal by drinking an astringent tea.
  • Rest and digest. Only eat your next meal once your previous meal has been digested. Ayurvedic guidelines suggest not to eat within three hours of your last meal. At the same time, try to avoid going without food for longer than six hours. Your breakfast should be modest, but your lunch should be larger and more satisfying. Depending on how hungry you are, you may choose to eat dinner or forgo it completely. Snacks are discouraged, especially at night. These guidelines are meant to help support digestion and healthy bowel movement.
  • Eat local foods. One of the principles of Ayurveda is fostering good social connections. Purchasing food from your local farmer’s market allows you to support your community and get to know it better. It is also a good way to get fresh produce and unprocessed foods that are free from chemicals and preservatives. Furthermore, you can also learn to grow your own food and share your harvest with your family.
  • Don’t consider it a “diet-diet”. It bears mentioning again that you shouldn’t be limited by your dosha. Eliminating certain fruits and vegetables entirely just because they are not favored by your dosha could cause you to miss out on essential nutrients and have your diet backfire on you. The principles of Ayurveda are not supposed to hold you back. They are meant to help you learn how to eat intuitively.

The power of the elements: Discover Colloidal Silver Mouthwash with quality, natural ingredients like Sangre de Drago sap, black walnut hulls, menthol crystals and more. Zero artificial sweeteners, colors or alcohol. Learn more at the Health Ranger Store and help support this news site.

If you want to learn more about other healthy lifestyle choices and diets, you can read more articles by going to Slender.news.

Sources include:

Health.USNews.com

VeryWellFit.com


Receive Our Free Email Newsletter

Get independent news alerts on natural cures, food lab tests, cannabis medicine, science, robotics, drones, privacy and more.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Health

Now 10 cases of measles diagnosed in B.C. outbreak, vaccinations way up

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

VANCOUVER — Two new cases of measles have been diagnosed in the Vancouver area for a total of 10 illnesses as health officials say they’re concerned they can’t find the source of one of the infections.

Vancouver Coastal medical health officer Dr. Althea Hayden says nine of the cases are clearly associated with schools that were at the centre of the original outbreak this month, but they don’t know where the other person contracted the disease.

The health authority has also released a list of locations where one of the infected people travelled over three days from Feb. 15 to Feb. 18, including restaurants, on a Canada Line commuter train and Langara College.

Hayden says the health authority is doing its best to find the source of measles in the 10th person in an effort to prevent more people from being exposed.

Measles at first presents with flu-like symptoms, coughing, a runny nose and red eyes, but then a fever develops, followed by the distinctive rash.

Hayden says the response to a call for people to get vaccinated has been fantastic and the health authority has seen a large number of first-time vaccinations.

“It’s the best thing that people can do to protect themselves, it’s the best thing we all can do to protect our community.”

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Health

Students with ADHD less likely to enrol in post-secondary education, study says

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

Danielle Edwards, The Canadian Press


Published Friday, February 22, 2019 2:58PM EST

OTTAWA — Students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely to go to college or university than those with no long-term health conditions, according to a new report from Statistics Canada.

The gap suggests teachers need better training in how to work with students whose behaviour can come off as disruptive and who might seem uninterested in their studies, advocates say.

“They are going to have one to three kids with ADHD in every class they teach for the rest of their career, and this is just regular classrooms, yet we’re not training them,” said Heidi Bernhardt, the executive director of the Centre for ADHD Awareness.

Researchers found that young people with neither a mental-health nor a neurodevelopmental disorder, 77 per cent had enrolled in a post-secondary program.

Only 48 per cent of Canadians between 18 and 22 years old who had a diagnosed mental-health condition had enrolled in a post-secondary institution. That includes students diagnosed with emotional, psychological or nervous conditions, but nearly three-quarters of this group were diagnosed with ADHD, which is considered a mental illness.

The researchers found 60 per cent of youth diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders enrolled, including people with epilepsy, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities.

Among young adults with both a mental-health and a neurodevelopmental condition, 36 per cent had enrolled in higher education.

The report used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, as well as some data from income-tax returns.

Educators may misinterpret the symptoms of ADHD as bad behaviour, leaving students discouraged about learning and more prone to dropping out of high school, said Bernhardt. She said students with ADHD and no additional learning disabilities score eight to 10 per cent lower in math and reading.

Andrew King, director of communications at the Canadian Teachers’ Federation, said there is no data on the number of teachers across the country who are trained in supporting students with special needs.

Bernhardt also said supports for students with ADHD are inconsistent across provinces.

Ontario has a system for identifying “exceptionalities” for students that divides disorders into five different categories, including autism and intellectual disabilities. ADHD isn’t on that list.

Dr. Philippe Robaey, head of the ADHD team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, said learning organizational skills is the biggest challenge facing students with the disorder, which can be difficult when they struggle with staying focused on one task.

“When I see kids with ADHD, what they often will say is that ‘I’m stupid.’ Of course they are not, this is the perception they may just develop about themselves, but they are not able to do things so they can develop very poor self-esteem and not believe in what they can do.”

Robaey said setting students with ADHD up for success starts with individualized learning plans and access to specialized classrooms and teachers who are equipped to encourage youth with special needs.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Health

New biological batteries use energy inspired by electric eels, could be used on next-gen robots, bio-implants

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

(Natural News) Battery technology is constantly improving, despite there being only fair coverage about it on the news. Unless you’re specifically looking for what’s new in the world of rechargeable batteries, you aren’t likely to find a lot of information. But there are many experts around the world who are currently working on improving the…

Read More

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending