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‘The weirdest bird I’ve ever seen’: Sighting of flamboyant duck brightens birders’ January

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When Christopher Deane first caught a glimpse of the mandarin duck in the Lower Mainland, he knew it wasn’t from around here.

“I thought that’s the weirdest bird I’ve ever seen,” the hobby birder told CBC News. “It looks like a parade float! They just don’t look like a normal bird. They’re all fancy and frilly!”

The mandarin duck is native to East Asia, but has made appearances in the Lower Mainland. Dean spotted one in Stanley Park last year, and in Burnaby just a few days ago.

In fact, recent sightings in Deer Lake Park have prompted dozens of wildlife and nature photographers to crowd the lake in hopes of catching a glimpse.

Colourful critters

Male mandarin ducks are known for their intensely colourful plumage, which includes a purple crest and two large orange “sails” at their rear.

Avid birder and professional photographer John Priessl was one of the first to spot the bird in the Burnaby park, Dec. 28, 2018, while he was leading a wildlife tour.

Birders and photographers crowded the boardward along Deer Lake attempting to catch a glimpse of the colourful bird. (John Preissl)

“We stumbled upon it just by accident,” he told CBC News. “We decided it was a good place for a lot of photographers and people from the birding community to view the duck, where it was.”

Dozens of people lined the boardwalk near the northern end of Deer Lake park following the initial sighting. Priessl says the duck only makes itself visible a couple of times per day.

The mandarin duck has colourful plumage, including a purple crest and two large orange feathers on its back. (John Preissl)

Unfortunately, Priessl says, several people attempted to lure the bird out by giving it food.

“That’s a big no-no in the wildlife photography world,” said Priessl. He warns food can be harmful to its health and even attract it into areas where there are predators.

Where did it come from?

According to Georgle Clulow, former president of the B.C. Field Ornithologists, this particular bird was likely the same one spotted last year in Burnaby Lake Park, when it was a juvenile.

George Clulow says the mandarin duck is native to parts of East Asia that have similar climates to the Lower Mainland. (Jon Hernandez/CBC)

“This is almost certainly a bird that’s been released, probably initially at Burnaby Lake,” said Clulow. “As the years progressed, this bird has moulted into a beautiful, male mandarin duck. It’s such a beautiful bird, it’s attracting a lot of attention.”

Mandarin ducks are typically found in Japan and in eastern parts of Russia and China. Clulow says its native climate is similar to that of the Lower Mainland, enabling the bird to live comfortably in local parks.

He says the bird is closely related to the North American wood duck and is likely looking for a mate.

“There are known hybrids between mandarin ducks and wood ducks, but for the most part … they’re not fertile. So there won’t be a breeding population of hybrids.”

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Biometric Vaccines Are Here Preceding Forced Digital ID

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The future of vaccines is here, just in time for the coming forced digital ID. This isn’t some sci-fi movie based on some conspiracy theorists’ idea of Revelation where every living being is required to be tagged. Biometric vaccines are real, are in use and have been deployed in the United States.

Biometric vaccines are immunizations laced with digital biometrics, created from merging the tech industry with big pharma. This new form of vaccine injects microchips into the body creating a global ID matrix to track and control every person. Not only has this satanic system already been rolled out, billions may already have been injected unaware.

ID2020 Alliance, a program aimed at chipping every person on earth, has collaborated with GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations) to inject these microchips into the body through immunization. 

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How to get more of everything you love about Ottawa

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We love Ottawa, and we want to help you make the most of living in the capital.

Ottawa Magazine is launching a new membership program, with front-of-the-line access to events, special offers at cultural institutions, and exclusive access to one-of-a-kind food and drink experiences at the city’s best restaurants. And of course, a subscription to our award-winning magazine.

Basically, everything you love about the city… just more of it.

Sign up for more information now and you’ll be one of the first to hear when memberships go on sale!

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Where to Live Now: A data-driven look at Ottawa neighbourhoods

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What does community have to do with buying a house? Do people really want friendly neighbours, or do they just want the most square footage for their buck?

In The Village Effect: How Face-to-Face Contact Can Make Us Healthier, Happier and Smarter, Montreal psychologist Susan Pinker cited a 2010 study conducted at Brigham Young University in Idaho that analyzed relationship data for more than 300,000 people over nearly eight years. She discovered that people who were integrated into their communities had half the risk of dying during that time as those who led more solitary lives. In Pinker’s analysis, integration meant simple interactions such as exchanging baked goods, babysitting, borrowing tools, and spur-of-the-moment visits — exactly the kinds of exchanges we saw grow when COVID-19 forced us all to stay home.

For this year’s real estate feature in the Spring/Summer 2020 print edition, we crunched the numbers to find the neighbourhoods where we think you’re most likely to find such opportunities for engagement. Using data available through the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study (ONS), we chose six indicators that we believed would attract those looking to connect with the people around them. Omitting rural areas, we awarded points to each neighbourhood according to where it landed in the ranking. (In the event of a tie, we used a secondary indicator of the same theme to refine the ranking.) You’ll find the ten neighbourhoods that performed the best according to those six indicators listed below, along with resident profiles and notable destinations in each ’hood — though many have been forced to adapt to COVID-19, most are offering delivery and/or take-out, and we are hopeful they will resume normal operations once it is safe to do so.

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