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Flight secrets: The passenger habit that leaves cabin crew disgusted | Travel News | Travel

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The staff are there to check passports and greet excited travellers as they embark, before giving safety demonstrations and helping passengers cram their luggage into the sometimes-tricky overhead storage containers. During the journey, they can be called upon from everything from sweet treats and boozy tipples to samples of the in-flight perfume brands. Such interaction with customers can span both short and long haul flights, with no two journeys ever the same. Understandably, a variety of differeing issues and scenarios therefore occur.

Now a former cabin crew has revealed the most disgusting thing a traveller can do while they are thousands of miles above sea level, and the reveal may come as somewhat of a surprise.

Linda Ferguson, flight attendant, said: “Flight attendants have seen everything from vomit to blood to spilled food hit that carpet.

“We see people walking from their seats into the bathrooms all the time barefoot and we cringe because those floors are full of germs.”

Linda, who worked as a flight attendant for 24 years, added: “Never walk barefoot into the bathroom or the galley area because sometimes we drop glasses and there could be sharp glass there, too.”

Some safe words of advice for those who like to remove their shoes for the journey.

While she is not suggesting this should not happen, passengers should perhaps be aware to slip them back on before going for a stroll to release their legs, or trip to the on-board bathroom.

Meanwhile, a secret about the interaction between cabin crew staff has also been revealed.

A pilot and former airline employee has revealed there is one specific time on the route where all talking between staff – both pilots and flight attendants – is banned.

Amanda Twine has let slip it is when the aircraft is travelling below 10,000ft – and guarantees passengers will not hear a peep from staff.

She revealed: “The flight attendants are not permitted to contact the pilots below 10,000 feet.

“The pilots are not even allowed to engage in general chit-chat between themselves during this period. Why? Short answer – for safety reasons.

“The most task intensive period for a pilot is during take-off and landing, and pretty much any time the aircraft is below 10,000 feet.

“This period in the flight requires the pilots to do complete checks, communicate with air traffic control, enter data into the flight computer and cross-check instruments.

“The last thing they need is the flight attendants calling them on the phone or their colleague asking them how their kids birthday party went on the weekend.”

She added: “There are of course procedures to follow in the event of an emergency that requires the flight attendants and crew to communicate during take-off or landing – although rare, this does happen.”

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