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Ryanair flights: Airline INCREASES its hand luggage fees again | Travel News | Travel

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Ryanair appears to have upped its hand luggage fees. The price hike comes after the Irish airline introduced strict rules in November 2018. Under the new policy, only a small handbag or laptop-size bag will be allowed onboard. It has to measure no more than 40cm x 20cm x 25cm to be allowed in the cabin for free. Previously, passengers who wanted to bring more luggage had to pay £6 extra to benefit from priority boarding, which they could bring both a small bag and a larger bag for the overhead locker.

Ryanair travellers could also pay to take a suitcase on board that measured no more than 55cm x 40cm x 20cm. It couldn’t more than 10kg and would be left at the airport drop desk.

Previously this check-in bag cost £8 during booking or £10 after booking.

However, passengers booking now will find, after going through the flight selection process, that priority boarding has increased by £2 to £8.

Meanwhile, the extra 10kg suitcase will now cost £10 during booking.

These new sums can only be seen once flights have been selected. Ryanair’s cabin bag policy page continues to show the prices of ‘From £6’ for priority and ‘From £8’ for the 10kg bag.

There has been no official announcement regarding these increased fees. Express.co.uk has contacted Ryanair for comment on the price hike but at the time of writing had received no response.

The upped charges are likely to cause further annoyance among passengers. Following the introduction of the new rules in November, social media was flooded with complaints about airport queues. 

Many Ryanair passengers uploaded photos of the long queues they were experiencing at the airport.

One passenger tweeted: “Ryanair how can you advertise as priority boarding when over half the plane have so-called ‘priority’?”

Another wrote: “As expected, Ryanair’s new policy that you must purchase Priority to get your small bag in the cabin = everyone books Priority.”

“Expect this to become the new ‘normal’ and something else to be removed for additional purchase. Successful but relentlessly irritating business plan.”

Some have said they’d like their money back as paying for priority means very little.

“I paid priority boarding but looks like it’s not priority. How do I have my money back?” one person tweeted, along with a picture of people queueing.

The airline has cautioned that passengers who bring a small bag to the gate which is too big to fit under the seat in front will be charged a fee of £25.

The same will apply if travellers attempt to bring an unpaid-for second bag to the gate.

Ryanair previously insisted the new changes are to improve timekeeping rather than make more money.

The airline intends to streamline the process by eliminating the need to take cabin bags off passengers at the departure gate and check them into the hold.

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