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Investors have ‘low expectations’ for Verizon 5G Home

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Investors aren’t betting on big results from Verizon’s so-called cable-disrupting 5G offering.

In a Morgan Stanley survey of over 50 telecom investors, analysts said investors had “low expectations” for the 5G home broadband offering that launched at the end of 2018.

The note said that 45% of survey respondents predicted the Verizon 5G Home would have less than 100,000 subscribers by the end of 2019. Another 27% said there would be between 100,000 and 200,000.

Verizon began offering its 5G Home service to customers in four initial markets — Houston, Indianapolis, Los Angeles, and Sacramento — in October, choosing cities where Verizon is not the incumbent carrier, meaning there is room for growth in the market.

The service is separate from 5G mobile service, which is yet to launch from any of the wireless providers. It’s instead a home broadband solution. While cable companies provide fixed-line broadband to homes, or internet delivered through cables that connect to a modem, 5G fixed-wireless broadband uses radio signals and the installation of an antenna outside of the home to deliver internet.

Offering fixed-wireless broadband may be a way for telcos to fight back against cable companies, which are increasingly stealing broadband customers away. Bolstered by a strong economy and a growing necessity for a fast, persistent, in-home internet connection, analysts see continued growth opportunities for cable.

Read more: The CEO of Charter is on the lookout for cable deals, and he just took a swing at Verizon’s plan to disrupt his business

Verizon itself has positioned its 5G Home offering as a cable disrupter, stating that “Verizon 5G Home is ideal for consumers looking to ‘cut the cord’ or upgrade from their current cable service,” in a release in September.

The company has so far provided scant details on the number of subscribers it’s added since its launch. Verizon declined further specifics about the service when contacted by Business Insider.

But according to Cowen analysts, at an analyst event in November, Verizon management said about half of the customers who signed up for 5G Home were not previously Verizon customers, which was surprising since there was a notable discount for Verizon customers.

Verizon did not share underlying details about what type of companies they were stealing share from, whether that was cable companies or telcos that offer service in the area, according to the analysts at Cowen.

Based on this note from Morgan Stanley, the telecom investing community does not expect to see significant disruption from 5G Home.

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Putin wants his own private internet

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New Russian laws could soon isolate the country’s Runet from the rest of the internet as it seeks to tighten its grip on the information that flows in and out of the country.

A new bill, backed by President Vladimir Putin and Moscow lawmakers, is currently being pushed through parliament which would create a single command post from which local authorities can manage and even halt information flowing across the internet in Russia.

The country’s so called “Sovereign Internet” bill is being portrayed by Putin as a defensive response to the Trump Administration’s new cyber strategy that would allow the US to launch offensive measures against Russia and any other nation states known for committing nefarious activities online.

Andrei Soldatov, author of “The Red Web: The Kremlin’s Wars on the Internet”, told Bloomberg that he thinks the law isn’t aimed at foreign threats but at quelling civil unrest, saying:

“This law isn’t about foreign threats, or banning Facebook and Google, which Russia can already do legally. It’s about being able to cut off certain types of traffic in certain areas during times of civil unrest.” 

Sovereign internet

The law, currently in draft form, was co-authored by KGB veteran Andrei Lugovoi who’s wanted in the UK for the murder of a renegade agent, is actually a mixture of several bills, some of which have been in development for years.

According to Putin, the ultimate goal is to ensure that the Runet continues to function in the event that the US tries to block Russia from accessing the rest of the internet.

If the bill does pass, the country would install special boxes with tracking software at the thousands of exchange points that link it to the rest of the web. These units would feed data into a central nerve center from which regulators could analyze web traffic and reroute traffic that they do not deem appropriate for the Russian populace.

Russian censorship has grown stronger in recent years and if Putin has his way, the country’s internet will soon resemble that of China’s where access to the outside web is blocked by the Great Firewall.

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The Internet Has Become A ‘Completely Out-Of-Control Monster,’ Warns Successor Of Man Who Created It

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Nearly 30 years ago a group of scientists at a Swiss physics institution came up with a novel idea to share data and work between themselves across the globe. The groundbreaking concept was the brainchild of Sir Tim Berners-Lee, whose vision for a “decentralized information management system” eventually gave birth to the world wide web.

Fast forward three decades and the internet has invaded all corners of the globe and governs all areas of life. It has become a power without equal. Some have suggested it has become a Frankenstein’s monster which needs to be reined in, and fast

One such person is Francois Fluckiger, the man who would become Sir Tim’s successor at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research.

The Daily Mail reports that Fluckiger believes fake news, privacy threats, and online bullying have all conspired to turn the internet into a “completely out-of-control monster.”

When Sir Tim left CERN’s web team in 1994, Fluckiger picked up the reins. He has since retired, and although he has hailed the web as one of the three major inventions of the 20th century, he believes it has morphed into something almost unrecognizable from its early days.

“One has to ask oneself if we did not, in the end, create a completely out-of-control monster,” said Fluckiger.

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Bali’s silent day: No flights, internet on New Year

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Bali’s airport will close for 24 hours, the internet will be turned off and streets emptied as the island in Indonesia observes its New Year with an annual day of silence.

‘Nyepi’ begins at 6 AM on Thursday, clearing beaches and all public spaces of people except for special patrols to ensure silence is observed. For the second year, phone companies will turn off the mobile internet on the island, home to more than four million people.

Balinese will stay indoors, covering windows and keeping lights off for the day of reflection.

“A day of silence to mark Saka (Balinese calendar) New Year for us is an opportunity to restart life with a pure heart,” said Wayan Gota, a hotel manager in Kuta, one of the island’s tourist hotspots.

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