Connect with us

Headlines

Someone get Jagmeet Singh a newspaper subscription

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Welcome to a sneak peek of the Maclean’s Politics Insider newsletter. Sign-up at the bottom of the page to get it delivered straight to your inbox.

Canada’s economy may be growing, but more than 56 per cent of Canadians feel like the country is in a recession—up 21 points from a year earlier. That’s the finding of a new survey by Pollara Strategic Insights, and the rising sense of economic anxiety could be a big factor in the federal election this fall if it persists:

Pollara’s finding that Canadians are feeling uneasy about the country’s prospects for prosperity comes just after Bank of Canada governor Stephen Poloz decided to hold interest rates steady, rather than continuing to gradually raise them. The central bank’s main reason for keeping its benchmark rate at 1.75 per cent earlier this week is that the recent drop in oil prices has taken a toll on the economy.

But Poloz suggested that by this coming spring the economy might be strong enough again to absorb higher rates. “As the snow melts, we’ll have a clearer view that the economy is back on track and then likely to grow above or around two per cent after that,” he told reporters.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s Liberals have to be hoping Poloz is right that the economy might feel like it has more traction by spring or summer—with a federal election campaign set for the fall. “This will undoubtedly influence what the various leaders talk about in the campaign,” Pollara’s Worden said. (Maclean’s)

We’ll find out this morning who’ll be part of Trudeau’s cabinet in the lead-up to the 2019 campaign (barring another shuffle—the last one was only six months ago).  Today’s cabinet shakeup follows the departure of Scott Brison, who resigned as Treasury Board president last week.

It’s likely that Trudeau will keep the changes to a minimum, though given the Treasury Board slot requires a senior minister for the role, that means another senior opening will need to be filled, and so on. Top among the names circulating to fill Brison’s shoes: Indigenous Services Minister Jane Philpott, though Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale, Environment Minister Catherine McKenna and Public Services Minister Carla Qualtrough also got namechecked. (CBC NewsCanadian Press)

On the other hand, rather than just tweak his cabinet, Trudeau may decide to embark on a major renovation to address key vulnerabilities the government faces  ahead of the election. If that’s the case, CBC poll analyst Eric Grenier looks at some of the Trudeau government’s weakest links, starting with deficit-challenged Finance Minister Bill Morneau: “If one measure of a subordinate’s performance is whether he or she makes the boss look good, Morneau does not shine.” (CBC News)

ICYMI, a roundup from the weekend political shows…

  • CTV Question Period’s Evan Solomon had what seemed like a straightforward question for NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, related to Canada’s ongoing dispute with China: what did Singh make of the the headline-grabbing editorial by China’s ambassador to Canada which claimed “white supremacy” was behind the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou. Singh appeared to have no idea what Solomon was referring to: “Who accused who of white supremacy?” (Twitter)
  • In the event of a no-deal Brexit, the United Kingdom has already begun informal trade talks with Canada that could lead to a trade deal between the two countries within a year. Speaking to CBC’s Chris Hall on The House, the U.K.’s High Commissioner to Canada, Susan le Jeune d’Allegeershecque, sought to ease panicked Canadian businesses that do much of their business with the U.K.:  “I think we’re both acutely aware of the potential negative impact of a cliff edge and nothing being in place to allow that [relationship] to continue.” (CBC News)
  • The head of the Business Council of Canada, Goldy Hyder, said the odds of the Trans Mountain pipeline going ahead in the near future are low, given the tensions in the past week between Indigenous people and police over a gas pipeline in northern B.C.: “If I was a betting man, I’d say not anytime soon and it’s not for the lack of effort,” he told the West Block‘s Mercedes Stephenson on Global, “I recognize that a government purchased the pipeline, I recognize that the court decision put a bit of a delay in that process. But the question is what happens if what we’re seeing now happened all over again at the TMX site?”

Lastly, continuing a Canadian prime ministerial tradition, Trudeau will make a cartoon cameo appearance on an upcoming episode of Corner Gas – Animated, creator Brent Butt tweeted. Both Paul Martin and Stephen Harper made brief appearances on the original series. (Twitter).

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Headlines

Ottawa unveils funding for poultry and egg farmers hurt by free-trade deals

Editor

Published

on

By

Canadian egg and poultry farmers who’ve lost domestic market share due to two recent free-trade agreements will soon have access to $691 million in federal cash, Canada’s agriculture minister announced Saturday.

Marie-Claude Bibeau shared details of the long-awaited funds in a virtual news conference.

“Today we position our young farmers for growth and success tomorrow,” she said.

The money follows a previously announced $1.75 billion for the dairy sector linked to free-trade deals with Europe and countries on the Pacific Rim, one that came into effect in 2017 and the other in 2018.

The dairy sector funds were to flow over eight years, and the first $345 million payment was sent out last year.

But on Saturday, Bibeau announced a schedule for the remaining payments that will see the money flow over three years — beginning with $468 million in 2020-21, $469 million in 2021-22 and $468 million in 2022-23.

Bibeau said the most recently announced funds for dairy farmers amount to an average farm of 80 cows receiving a direct payment of $38,000 in the first year.

Payments based on formulas

David Wiens, vice-president of the Dairy Farmers of Canada, said the money will help farms make investments for the future.

“I think particularly for the younger farmers who have really struggled since these agreements have been ratified, they can actually now see opportunities, how they can continue to make those investments on the farm so that they can continue on,” he said.

Continue Reading

Headlines

Employee of Ottawa Metro store tests positive for COVID-19

Editor

Published

on

By

Metro says an employee of its grocery store on Beechwood Avenue in Ottawa has tested positive for COVID-19.

The company says the employee’s positive test result was reported on Nov. 25. The employee had last been at work at the Metro at 50 Beechwood Ave. on Nov. 19.

Earlier this month, Metro reported several cases of COVID-19 at its warehouse on Old Innes Road.

Positive test results were reported on Nov. 2, Nov. 6, Nov. 11, and Nov. 19. The first two employees worked at the produce warehouse at 1184 Old Innes Rd. The other two worked at the distribution centre at the same address.

Metro lists cases of COVID-19 in employees of its stores and warehouses on its website

Continue Reading

Headlines

Tinseltown: Where 50-year-old ‘tough guys’ become youngsters again

Editor

Published

on

By

Audy Czigler wears glitter like a Pennsylvania miner wears coal dust. It’s on his face and hands, in his hair and on his clothing. It’s an occupational hazard that he says he just can’t get rid of.

And when he’s sifting through job applications from people wanting to work at his Tinseltown Christmas Emporium on Somerset Street W. in Hintonburg, the glitter is a consideration. For he’s not looking for people who can simply endure it; no, he’s screening for people who revel and carouse in glitter, for those for whom the 10,000th playing of I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus is as refreshing as the first, for those who believe that the 12 days of Christmas last 365 days a year. The believers.

Sure, he has heard the voices of skeptical passersby on the sidewalk outside his shop, especially in the summer months when visions of sugarplums have receded from many people’s minds.

“I hear them out there a few times a day,” he says, “wondering how a Christmas store can possibly survive year-round.

“I want to go out and tell them,” he adds, but his voice trails off as a customer approaches and asks about an ornament she saw there recently, of a red cardinal in a white heart. Where is it?

There’s scant room for sidewalk skeptics now, crowded out by the dozens of shoppers who, since October, have regularly lined up outside the store, patiently biding their time (and flocks) as pandemic-induced regulations limit the shop to 18 customers at a time.

Once inside, visitors will be forgiven for not first noticing the glitter, or even the rendition of Baby, It’s Cold Outside playing on the speakers. For there’s no specific “first thing” you notice. The first thing you notice is EVERYTHING — a floor-to-ceiling cornucopia of festivity, reminiscent perhaps of how the blind man in the Gospel of John may have felt when Jesus rubbed spit and mud in his eyes and gave him sight for the first time.

https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/tinseltown-where-50-year-old-tough-guys-become-youngsters-again

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending