Connect with us

Headlines

Le climat et la crise du logement incitent Svend Robinson à faire son retour en politique

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Lors de l’annonce de sa candidature, mardi matin, Svend Robinson a soutenu que les défis liés aux changements climatiques et le manque de logements abordables sont les principales raisons qui l’ont poussé à faire un retour en politique. « Je me présente parce qu’il y a deux crises fondamentales qui touchent notre communauté et notre planète », affirme-t-il.

Le candidat néo-démocrate soutient que les prochaines élections fédérales représentent « la dernière occasion de faire changer les choses » en ce qui concerne le réchauffement climatique. « Le prochain mandat, c’est le mandat qui va décider si la planète a un futur », croit Svend Robinson.

Je crois qu’on doit vraiment déclarer une guerre contre les changements climatiques. C’est la crise qui menace notre planète.

Svend Robinson, candidat du NPD dans Burnaby-Nord-Seymour

En ce qui concerne la crise du logement, l’ancien député dit vouloir prendre une approche « fondamentalement différente » pour faire face aux problèmes. « Dans cette circonscription de Burnaby-Nord-Seymour, c’est impossible pour une jeune famille d’avoir un logement, dit-il. [Il faut] une reconnaissance que le marché ne peut pas répondre à ces défis. Il faut un rôle clef du gouvernement. »

Selon Svend Robinson, l’annonce de sa candidature plus de neuf mois avant la tenue des élections n’est pas liée à l’élection partielle en cours dans Burnaby-Sud, lors de laquelle le chef du NPD, Jagmeet Singh, espère se faire élire.

Il reconnaît tout de même que son retour au sein du parti néo-démocrate pourrait aider son chef dans sa campagne. « Il y a quelques commentaires qui disent qu’il y a pas mal de députés qui quittent le caucus, explique-t-il. Ce n’est pas une mauvaise chose qu’un ancien, un vieux routier, revienne pour appuyer Jagmeet et le parti. »

« Une erreur terrible »

Svend Robinson a représenté la circonscription de Burnaby pendant 25 ans, jusqu’à ce qu’il quitte la scène politique en 2004, après avoir admis qu’il avait volé une bague de valeur lors d’un encan.

Il avait alors expliqué son geste par le stress et des problèmes psychologiques, et l’avait qualifié de « purement irrationnel ». Reconnaissant qu’il souffrait de problèmes de santé mentale au moment des faits, le tribunal lui avait accordé une absolution sous conditions.

J’ai fait une erreur terrible il y a 15 ans, mais je demande aux électeurs, aux Canadiens, de ne pas me juger seulement sur une erreur importante, mais de me juger sur ma vie de service. Vingt-cinq ans comme député, une décennie dans l’aide humanitaire internationale, ça, c’est Svend Robinson. Ça, c’est la personne que je suis.

Svend Robinson, candidat du NPD dans Burnaby-Nord-Seymour

Pendant ses années en politique fédérale, Svend Robinson s’est notamment battu pour l’aide médicale à mourir et a défendu les droits de la communauté LGBT. En 1988, il est devenu le premier député ouvertement gai au Canada.

Il avait tenté de se faire réélire aux élections de 2006, mais il avait été défait par la candidate libérale Hedy Fry dans la circonscription de Vancouver-Centre.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Headlines

Federal Budget 2021: Ottawa adds $1B to broadband fund for rural, remote communities

Editor

Published

on

By

The federal government will add $1 billion to a fund for improving high-speed communications in rural and remote areas of Canada, bringing the total to $2.75 billion by 2026, the Liberals said Monday in their first full budget since the pandemic began last year.

The money is going to the Universal Broadband Fund, which is designed to support the installation of “backbone” infrastructure that connects underserved communities to high-speed internet.

It’s one of many government and private-sector initiatives that have gained urgency since the pandemic began, as Canadians became more dependent on internet service for applications ranging from e-learning to daily business operations.

Ottawa says the additional money will keep it on track to have high-speed broadband in 98 per cent of the country by 2026, and 100 per cent by 2030.

Money spent on high-speed communications will be good for a recovering economy, said Pedro Antunes, chief economist at the Conference Board of Canada, a non-partisan think-tank.

The latest data from Statistics Canada says there were about five million people working from home during the pandemic, up from about two million prior to that, Antunes said in an interview.

“That’s a quarter or so of the workforce,” he added. “And I think a fair number of those people are going to continue to work from home, at least in some part-time way.”

Improved connections to high-speed broadband and mobile communications will add to the productive capacity of the economy overall, especially as it reaches beyond Canada’s cities, Antunes said.

He said there’s been a “real issue” with economic growth outside major urban centres and the improved connectivity “is something that can help stimulate that.”

The Universal Broadband Fund was initially mentioned in the 2019 budget, though specifics were not available until last November’s fiscal update.

The $1-billion top-up to the broadband fund announced today is in addition to $1.75 billion promised to the fund by the federal government’s November fiscal update.

Continue Reading

Headlines

COVID-19: What you need to know for April 19

Editor

Published

on

By

Provincewide

  • Per today’s government report, there are 4,447 new cases in Ontario, for a total of 421,442 since the pandemic began; 2,202 people are in hospital, 755 of them in intensive care, and 516 on ventilators. To date, 7,735 people have died.
  • According to data from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, there are 40 outbreaks in long-term-care facilities, 36 confirmed active cases of positive residents, and 127 confirmed active cases of positive staff. To date, there have been 3,755 confirmed resident deaths and 11 confirmed staff deaths.
  • Per the government’s report on Ontario’s vaccination program, as of 7 p.m. yesterday, Ontario has administered 66,897 new doses of COVID-19 vaccines, for a total of 3,904,778 since December 2020. 3,212,768 people have received only one dose, and 346,005 people have received both doses.

Continue Reading

Headlines

Federal budget 2021 highlights: Child care, recovery benefits, OAS increases – everything you need to know

Editor

Published

on

By

The federal government’s first budget in more than two years certainly looks the part: At 739 pages, it is a hefty document chock full of billions in new spending.

Those funds will be spread among a number of key groups – students, seniors, parents and small-business owners, to name a few – as Ottawa looks to bolster Canada’s recovery from COVID-19 but also plan for life beyond the pandemic.

To that end, the deficit is projected to hit $354.2-billion in the 2020-21 fiscal year, which just ended – better than expected about five months ago, given the economy’s resilience over the winter months. It is estimated to fall to $154.7-billion this fiscal year, before dropping further in the years to come as pandemic spending recedes from view.

Here are some of the highlights from Monday’s budget.

The budget outlines tens of billions of dollars in federal subsidies for a national child-care program, a promise the Liberal Party has made in some form since the early 1990s. Child-care supports became a point of national debate during pandemic lockdowns as parents with young children struggled to juggle work and family responsibilities.

In total, the government proposes spending as much as $30-billion over the next five years, and $8.3-billion each year after that, to bring child-care fees down to a $10-a-day average by 2026. The proposal, which requires negotiation with the provinces and territories, would split subsidies evenly with those governments and targets a 50-per-cent reduction in average child-care fees by the end of 2022.

The federal program is largely modelled on Quebec’s subsidized child-care system, implemented in the 1990s in an effort to increase women’s access to the labour market. Since then, labour participation rates for women aged 25 to 54 in the province have grown to exceed the national average by four percentage points.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending