Connect with us

Health

Is exposure to lead a risk for arthritis? Study finds correlation between lead in the blood and knee osteoarthritis – NaturalNews.com

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]


Image: Is exposure to lead a risk for arthritis? Study finds correlation between lead in the blood and knee osteoarthritis

(Natural News)
Knee osteoarthritis is a menace that plagues millions of people every single day. Since it’s something that affects so many people’s lives, scientists and other experts are always on the lookout for new and improved ways of administering treatment than currently known and available methods. One group of Egyptian researchers has now contributed their part to the cumulative human effort to handle the condition by conducting a study, which looks at the link between blood lead levels and knee osteoarthritis in patients.

In this study, which was published in the International Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, the researchers noted that lead is a common ubiquitous environmental pollutant, and that it may be one of the environmental factors affecting the increasing prevalence of knee osteoarthritis in young adult patients. So their primary aim, according to their research paper, is to try and find detailed information about the correlation between blood lead and hyaluronic acid levels and the degree of knee osteoarthritis among a group of patients.

In order to conduct their study, the researchers first needed to gather 90 patients aged 20 to 50 years, and confirm that each and every one of them had knee osteoarthritis. All patients were subjected to both clinical and radiological assessments of osteoarthritis to confirm the severity of their conditions. Then their blood samples were taken in order to estimate the blood lead level as well as to measure hyaluronic acid levels.

According to the researchers, there are very few studies investigating the correlation between the levels of blood lead and serum hyaluronic acid in young adult patients with knee osteoarthritis, so they came into some pretty interesting results and conclusions. Based on the data that they were able to gather, the researchers say that the blood levels detected in the participating patients are on the ranges that are considered toxic by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This could be attributed to the level of environmental pollution in Egypt, which has a higher exposure to lead than in other regions and populations, according to the researchers.

100% organic essential oil sets now available for your home and personal care, including Rosemary, Oregano, Eucalyptus, Tea Tree, Clary Sage and more, all 100% organic and laboratory tested for safety. A multitude of uses, from stress reduction to topical first aid. See the complete listing here, and help support this news site.

The research results show that there is a positive correlation between blood lead levels and the severity of both symptomatic and radiologic knee osteoarthritis. There was already an assumption that low levels of lead in the blood could cause a local toxic effect to bones and joints, and that it can only be made worse with high blood lead levels. It is also said that lead exposure could increase the susceptibility of so-called osteoblasts to environmental toxins, and that once the blood lead levels are increased, it leads to a cycle of increased tendency to toxic damage — regardless of causality.

Meanwhile, the research data shows that there is no association between blood lead levels and serum hyaluronic acid. This discrepancy could be due to population sample, study design, environmental influence, or genetic and ethnic factors, according to the researchers. In any case, the link that they did find between blood lead levels and knee osteoarthritis gives great insight into how current methods of assessing and treating the condition could be improved in the future.

For now, research on the matter will continue, especially since the researchers have yet to clarify the exact mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in relation to the different environmental pollutants that affected individuals are typically exposed to, including lead itself. That gives some hope that one day, a truly effective treatment for osteoarthritis can become widely available.

Sources include:

OpenAccessJournals.com

MedPageToday.com

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Health

Now 10 cases of measles diagnosed in B.C. outbreak, vaccinations way up

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

VANCOUVER — Two new cases of measles have been diagnosed in the Vancouver area for a total of 10 illnesses as health officials say they’re concerned they can’t find the source of one of the infections.

Vancouver Coastal medical health officer Dr. Althea Hayden says nine of the cases are clearly associated with schools that were at the centre of the original outbreak this month, but they don’t know where the other person contracted the disease.

The health authority has also released a list of locations where one of the infected people travelled over three days from Feb. 15 to Feb. 18, including restaurants, on a Canada Line commuter train and Langara College.

Hayden says the health authority is doing its best to find the source of measles in the 10th person in an effort to prevent more people from being exposed.

Measles at first presents with flu-like symptoms, coughing, a runny nose and red eyes, but then a fever develops, followed by the distinctive rash.

Hayden says the response to a call for people to get vaccinated has been fantastic and the health authority has seen a large number of first-time vaccinations.

“It’s the best thing that people can do to protect themselves, it’s the best thing we all can do to protect our community.”

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Health

Students with ADHD less likely to enrol in post-secondary education, study says

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

Danielle Edwards, The Canadian Press


Published Friday, February 22, 2019 2:58PM EST

OTTAWA — Students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely to go to college or university than those with no long-term health conditions, according to a new report from Statistics Canada.

The gap suggests teachers need better training in how to work with students whose behaviour can come off as disruptive and who might seem uninterested in their studies, advocates say.

“They are going to have one to three kids with ADHD in every class they teach for the rest of their career, and this is just regular classrooms, yet we’re not training them,” said Heidi Bernhardt, the executive director of the Centre for ADHD Awareness.

Researchers found that young people with neither a mental-health nor a neurodevelopmental disorder, 77 per cent had enrolled in a post-secondary program.

Only 48 per cent of Canadians between 18 and 22 years old who had a diagnosed mental-health condition had enrolled in a post-secondary institution. That includes students diagnosed with emotional, psychological or nervous conditions, but nearly three-quarters of this group were diagnosed with ADHD, which is considered a mental illness.

The researchers found 60 per cent of youth diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders enrolled, including people with epilepsy, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities.

Among young adults with both a mental-health and a neurodevelopmental condition, 36 per cent had enrolled in higher education.

The report used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, as well as some data from income-tax returns.

Educators may misinterpret the symptoms of ADHD as bad behaviour, leaving students discouraged about learning and more prone to dropping out of high school, said Bernhardt. She said students with ADHD and no additional learning disabilities score eight to 10 per cent lower in math and reading.

Andrew King, director of communications at the Canadian Teachers’ Federation, said there is no data on the number of teachers across the country who are trained in supporting students with special needs.

Bernhardt also said supports for students with ADHD are inconsistent across provinces.

Ontario has a system for identifying “exceptionalities” for students that divides disorders into five different categories, including autism and intellectual disabilities. ADHD isn’t on that list.

Dr. Philippe Robaey, head of the ADHD team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, said learning organizational skills is the biggest challenge facing students with the disorder, which can be difficult when they struggle with staying focused on one task.

“When I see kids with ADHD, what they often will say is that ‘I’m stupid.’ Of course they are not, this is the perception they may just develop about themselves, but they are not able to do things so they can develop very poor self-esteem and not believe in what they can do.”

Robaey said setting students with ADHD up for success starts with individualized learning plans and access to specialized classrooms and teachers who are equipped to encourage youth with special needs.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Health

New biological batteries use energy inspired by electric eels, could be used on next-gen robots, bio-implants

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

(Natural News) Battery technology is constantly improving, despite there being only fair coverage about it on the news. Unless you’re specifically looking for what’s new in the world of rechargeable batteries, you aren’t likely to find a lot of information. But there are many experts around the world who are currently working on improving the…

Read More

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending