Connect with us

LIFESTYLES

Meat with a side of geopolitics in Belgrade’s Kosovo-obsessed eatery

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Madagascar meatloaf, Laotian pork neck, Lesotho chicken kebab — politics, not palate sets the menu at Korcagin, a Serbian restaurant that serves food only from countries that don’t recognize Kosovo.

One Sunday families filled the Belgrade tavern for a meal not normally associated with the Balkan state’s meat-heavy cuisine: black tiger prawns drizzled with a zesty orange sauce.

It was billed as the national dish of Palau, a little-known archipelago in the Pacific Ocean that last month became the latest country to revoke recognition of Kosovo, a former Serbian province.

“Now everyone in Serbia knows Palau,” said Vojin Cucic, the 29-year-old owner of Korcagin, which every Sunday serves a speciality from a country that rejects Kosovo’s statehood.

Two decades after the ethnic Albanian-majority province broke away from Serbia in a guerrilla war, the neighbours are still locked in a heated recognition battle.

Kosovo has been recognized by more than 100 countries, including heavy hitters like the United States and most of Western Europe, since its 2008 independence declaration.

But that’s only slightly more than half of the UN’s 193 member states, with the other camp including powerful nations like Russia and China.

Belgrade is also actively fighting to unravel Pristina’s gains, with Serbia’s foreign minister regularly trumpeting the latest countries to reverse ties.

Never mind that many of them are places most would struggle to find on a map — like the Union of the Comoros, Suriname and most recently Palau.

Big or small, they share a fan base at Korcagin, whose walls are plastered with Yugoslavia-era photos, flags and other memorabilia from a time when Serbia and Kosovo were part of one country.

So far, the cooks have prepared more than 70 foreign dishes, giving preference to the countries that have rescinded their recognition.

Cucic, who inherited the restaurant from his father, says he is motivated by patriotism.

“If the U.S. would withdraw recognition, we would have three days of free drinks,” he says with a smile.

Numbers game

Pristina insists it is recognized by 116 nations.

“This is nothing but Serbian propaganda,” Jetlir Zyberaj, an advisor to Kosovo’s foreign minister, told AFP however, without delving into specific numbers.

The reality may be somewhere in between.

Some of the countries have affirmed their reversals, while others have not contested the announcements or responded to AFP requests for comment.

Last June, Serbia was left red-faced after announcing that Liberia had reversed its recognition, only to see the African country later issue a statement correcting the report.

It is not clear what other countries gain from their changes of heart.

Belgrade, whose foreign ministry refused to comment, often hails intentions to boost cooperation with the small states, but concrete details are hard to come by.

When asked what the small southern African nation of Lesotho received for its retraction, its foreign ministry told AFP: “Nothing apart from the normal bilateral cooperation between the two countries.”

Domestic audience

“My children ask me often where each country is, but these countries have the same voting rights (in the UN) as does China,” Serbian Foreign Minister Ivica Dacic recently told local media.

Boban Stojanovic, a political analyst in Belgrade, says the recognition game reflects the government’s effort “to show the public that Serbia is doing something” about Kosovo.

“In terms of international affairs, these countries…don’t have any impact on the general (status) of Kosovo,” he added.

For years Belgrade and Pristina have slogged through EU-led talks aimed at normalising their ties.

But broken promises and regular provocations keep derailing progress.

In Serbia, Kosovo remains a powerful rallying cry for nationalists who see the former province as the cradle of their culture and Orthodox Christian faith.

“Even if every country in the world recognises Kosovo, we still shouldn’t. Kosovo is ours,” Cucic said.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

LIFESTYLES

Nobody would give this teen with autism a job, so he started a business

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

A 17-year-old Australian teen with autism started his own business cleaning garbage bins after he was rejected for other jobs.

“I searched and applied for jobs for two years and did not get one interview,” Clay Lewis told CTV News Channel from his home in Brisbane, Australia.

As of January, his business, Clay’s Bin Cleaning, has made more than AUS$6,000 and has roughly 70 clients.

He charges AUS$10 for the first bin and AUS$5 for each additional bin. He regularly offers free bin cleaning to local charities.

“I’m very proud of him,” his mother Laura Lewis told CTV News Channel. “I knew that he could do it.”

She added that employers were unable to “see past their own judgments” and made “unfair assumptions” about Clay’s competency because of his disability.

Clay said that he is looking forward to attending his high school prom and may put some of his earnings toward funding a trip to Abu Dhabi to watch his first Formula 1 race.

Lewis said that Clay’s story has given hope to a lot of people, particularly parents of children with autism.

“All Clay is doing is living a 17-year-old’s ordinary life: working, going to school, having a girlfriend and hanging out with friends,” she said.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

LIFESTYLES

Meet Jelly Bean, the deaf canine contender for World’s Most Amazing Dog title

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

CTVNews.ca Staff, with a report from CTV London’s Sacha Long


Published Friday, February 22, 2019 7:50PM EST

A deaf Ontario dog is in the semi-finals of the World’s Most Amazing Dog competition, an interactive Facebook Watch show where dogs compete for a US$100,000 prize.

Jelly Bean, a three-year-old Australian cattle dog who lives in London, Ont., can catch and pass a ball with his front paws and jump on a stranger’s back. He follows the instructions of his handler, Melissa Mellitt, by sight because cannot hear.

“He is so highly intelligent,” Mellitt told CTV London. “He has no idea that he’s deaf. He doesn’t care. He’s just as happy as any other dog.”

Mellitt adopted Jelly Bean from the Deaf Dog Rescue of America when he was five months old. He has since gone on to travel across Canada as a professional stunt dog and works with Mellitt as an assistant to help rehabilitate fearful dogs.

“We knew that he had this potential,” she said. “This is exactly what I knew he was going to be.”

Mellitt hopes that Jelly Bean’s performance in the competition will help shatter some of the stigma around deaf dogs, who are often believed to be ill tempered and incapable of being trained. Mellitt said breeders euthanize many of them at birth, but she believes that Jelly Bean’s inability to hear is his “cool factor.”

If Jelly Bean wins the competition, Mellitt said that she plans to give half of the winnings to the Deaf Dog Rescue of America.

Viewers of the World’s Most Amazing Dogs competition get to vote on who should move to the finals.

“I think he could go all the way,” Mellitt said.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

LIFESTYLES

Funeral held for sailor in V-J Day Times Square kiss photo

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

NEWPORT, R.I. — The sailor photographed kissing a woman in Times Square at the end of World War II was mourned Friday at a funeral in Rhode Island.

George Mendonsa’s funeral was held at St. Mary’s Church in Newport, and he was buried at St. Columba Cemetery in Middletown.

Mendonsa died Sunday after he fell and had a seizure at an assisted living facility, his daughter said. He was 95 and leaves behind his wife of 72 years.

Mendonsa kissed Greta Zimmer Friedman, a dental assistant in a nurse’s uniform, on Aug. 14, 1945, known as V-J Day, the day Japan surrendered.

The two had never met.

Alfred Eisenstaedt’s photo of the kiss became one of the most famous photographs of the 20th century. First published in Life magazine, it’s called “V-J Day in Times Square,” but is known to most as “The Kiss.”

Another photographer, Victor Jorgensen, who was in the Navy, also captured the moment in a similar photo. The moment has been shared widely and is often seen on posters.

Several people later claimed to be the kissing couple, and it was years before Mendonsa and Friedman were confirmed to be the couple.

Mendonsa enlisted in the Navy in 1942, after high school. He served on a destroyer during the war.

Mendonsa was on leave when the end of the war was announced. When he was honoured at the Rhode Island State House in 2015, Mendonsa said Friedman reminded him of nurses on a hospital ship that he saw care for wounded sailors.

On Monday, a statue depicting the kiss in Sarasota, Florida, was vandalized. The phrase “.MeToo” was spray-painted on the leg of the statue.

Friedman said in a 2005 interview with the Veterans History Project that it wasn’t her choice to be kissed.

“The guy just came over and kissed or grabbed,” she told the Library of Congress.

She added, “It was just somebody really celebrating. But it wasn’t a romantic event.”

Friedman fled Austria during the war as a 15-year-old girl. She died in 2016 at age 92 at a hospital in Richmond, Virginia, from complications of old age.

After the war, Mendonsa became a commercial fisherman, like his father, and worked until he was 82. He died two days before his 96th birthday.

Survivors include his wife, Rita; and his children, Ronald Mendonsa and Sharon Molleur, and their families.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending