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What you need to know about this scary addictive response – NaturalNews.com

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Image: Sugar addiction is REAL: What you need to know about this scary addictive response

(Natural News)
People with a sweet tooth may not realize that their love for sugar might be an addiction.

This may be hard to believe since unlike most addictive substances, sugar is not illegal. Sweets are available almost everywhere and can even be bought by anyone, regardless of age. However, this only means that people have to be more careful with the amount of sugar that they’re eating to avoid getting addicted to it.

Sugar triggers the reward pathway, the same one that’s activated by any pleasurable activity, and causes neurons to produce more dopamine. This chemical is one of the feel-good hormones in the body. It signals the part of the brain called nucleus accumbens, which is involved in pleasure-related decision-making and motor movements. Furthermore, the process activates hormones that create cellular memory of the pleasurable experience of eating sweets. Because of these, people who are addicted to sugar tend to reach out for more sweets and will crave them more in the future.

Although this process also happens for other foods, it is stronger for sugar and carbohydrates. This is because the brain’s pleasure center has evolved to reward eating energy-giving foods. Sugar is a great source of energy. However, too much of it can cause blood glucose to rise to dangerous levels.

How does sugar addiction affect your body?

Sugar has been shown to work in a manner similar to drugs, causing abnormal dopamine spikes not caused by healthy foods. Studies have also shown that sugar affects the opioid pathway, the same one that’s activated by the use of heroin and morphine. (Related: Sugar junkie? Study suggests excessive sugar intake is similar to drug addiction.)

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Sugar addiction has also been associated with many health problems, including:

  • Heart disease — In one study, researchers found that people who ate 25 percent of their daily calorie intake from sugar were twice as likely to die from heart disease compared to those who got less than 10 percent of their calories from sugar.
  • Depression — A person’s mental health can also suffer from sugar addiction. This is because regular sugar consumption can cause blood glucose levels to fluctuate throughout the day and consequently, induce mood swings. Studies have also shown that sugar can increase the risk of depression, especially in patients with schizophrenia, since it can suppress the hormone known as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).
  • Excessive inflammation — Inflammation is a natural response that occurs during the healing process. However, too much of it can lead to chronic health problems like heart disease, cancer, stroke, and arthritis. People who eat too much sugar put their body in a constant state of inflammation which consequently increases their risk of these diseases.
  • Diabetes — Sugar addiction can lead to insulin resistance, which allows blood sugar levels to rise to unhealthy levels. This condition can progress into Type 2 diabetes and increase the risk of amputation due to the insufficient blood supply to peripheral areas like the legs and feet.

Sugar withdrawal

Completely removing sugar from your diet may lead to withdrawal symptoms similar to those that result from a drug detox. These include anxiety, depression, mood swings, irritability, fatigue, flu-like symptoms, headaches, and trembling. In addition to this, you may experience more intense sugar cravings, changes in appetite, and sleeping problems like insomnia.

Overcoming sugar addiction is more easily achieved if you gradually remove sugar from your diet. Go for healthier options like fruit instead of sugar-laden sweets. There are also healthy sugar alternatives that you can use.

Read more news articles on the harmful effects of sugar by visiting Sweeteners.news.

Sources include:

NaturalHealth365.com

Healthline.com

SweetDefeat.com

Guide.Michelin.com

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Now 10 cases of measles diagnosed in B.C. outbreak, vaccinations way up

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VANCOUVER — Two new cases of measles have been diagnosed in the Vancouver area for a total of 10 illnesses as health officials say they’re concerned they can’t find the source of one of the infections.

Vancouver Coastal medical health officer Dr. Althea Hayden says nine of the cases are clearly associated with schools that were at the centre of the original outbreak this month, but they don’t know where the other person contracted the disease.

The health authority has also released a list of locations where one of the infected people travelled over three days from Feb. 15 to Feb. 18, including restaurants, on a Canada Line commuter train and Langara College.

Hayden says the health authority is doing its best to find the source of measles in the 10th person in an effort to prevent more people from being exposed.

Measles at first presents with flu-like symptoms, coughing, a runny nose and red eyes, but then a fever develops, followed by the distinctive rash.

Hayden says the response to a call for people to get vaccinated has been fantastic and the health authority has seen a large number of first-time vaccinations.

“It’s the best thing that people can do to protect themselves, it’s the best thing we all can do to protect our community.”

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Students with ADHD less likely to enrol in post-secondary education, study says

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Danielle Edwards, The Canadian Press


Published Friday, February 22, 2019 2:58PM EST

OTTAWA — Students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely to go to college or university than those with no long-term health conditions, according to a new report from Statistics Canada.

The gap suggests teachers need better training in how to work with students whose behaviour can come off as disruptive and who might seem uninterested in their studies, advocates say.

“They are going to have one to three kids with ADHD in every class they teach for the rest of their career, and this is just regular classrooms, yet we’re not training them,” said Heidi Bernhardt, the executive director of the Centre for ADHD Awareness.

Researchers found that young people with neither a mental-health nor a neurodevelopmental disorder, 77 per cent had enrolled in a post-secondary program.

Only 48 per cent of Canadians between 18 and 22 years old who had a diagnosed mental-health condition had enrolled in a post-secondary institution. That includes students diagnosed with emotional, psychological or nervous conditions, but nearly three-quarters of this group were diagnosed with ADHD, which is considered a mental illness.

The researchers found 60 per cent of youth diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders enrolled, including people with epilepsy, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities.

Among young adults with both a mental-health and a neurodevelopmental condition, 36 per cent had enrolled in higher education.

The report used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, as well as some data from income-tax returns.

Educators may misinterpret the symptoms of ADHD as bad behaviour, leaving students discouraged about learning and more prone to dropping out of high school, said Bernhardt. She said students with ADHD and no additional learning disabilities score eight to 10 per cent lower in math and reading.

Andrew King, director of communications at the Canadian Teachers’ Federation, said there is no data on the number of teachers across the country who are trained in supporting students with special needs.

Bernhardt also said supports for students with ADHD are inconsistent across provinces.

Ontario has a system for identifying “exceptionalities” for students that divides disorders into five different categories, including autism and intellectual disabilities. ADHD isn’t on that list.

Dr. Philippe Robaey, head of the ADHD team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, said learning organizational skills is the biggest challenge facing students with the disorder, which can be difficult when they struggle with staying focused on one task.

“When I see kids with ADHD, what they often will say is that ‘I’m stupid.’ Of course they are not, this is the perception they may just develop about themselves, but they are not able to do things so they can develop very poor self-esteem and not believe in what they can do.”

Robaey said setting students with ADHD up for success starts with individualized learning plans and access to specialized classrooms and teachers who are equipped to encourage youth with special needs.

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New biological batteries use energy inspired by electric eels, could be used on next-gen robots, bio-implants

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(Natural News) Battery technology is constantly improving, despite there being only fair coverage about it on the news. Unless you’re specifically looking for what’s new in the world of rechargeable batteries, you aren’t likely to find a lot of information. But there are many experts around the world who are currently working on improving the…

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