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Wine from fruit peels offers health benefits and eliminates food waste – NaturalNews.com

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Image: We’ve all heard to eat the peel on nutritious fruit; now you can drink it: Wine from fruit peels offers health benefits and eliminates food waste

(Natural News)
While fruits may be considered as nature’s candy, they contain far more than just sugar and empty calories. Indeed, eating fruits can give you many health benefits, most of which you’ll be able to see or feel immediately. But did you ever consider that the fruit peels that you tend to just throw away after can hold health benefits too?

That’s part of the idea that a group of researchers from Africa had in mind when they conducted a study that focused on alternative ways of using fruit peels. In it, the researchers managed to create wine from peels of a couple of different fruits, then eventually mixed the two together for a third variation. Through their research, they were able to conclude that it’s possible to produce good quality wine from fruit peels.

According to the researchers, the primary motivation for their study is the fact that the act of processing fruits into juices and other related products typically generates a lot of waste in the form of peels, which then end up causing disposal problems. As such, they found that it was necessary to find an alternative method of utilizing these waste products to minimize the problem of actually disposing them. The solution they found is a rather straightforward and simple one: Use the peels to make wine.

In the introduction of their researcher paper, the researchers mentioned that wine-making is one of the most ancient technologies and that it is now one of the most commercially prosperous biotechnological processes known to man. So, they thought, wouldn’t it be wonderful if, in the act of reducing food waste in the form of peels, they could produce something – a product – that they could then sell to make a profit? That’s practically the whole basis of their research. And it turns out that the answer to that question is yes – you can make wine of acceptable quality just from using fruit peels for raw materials.

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The raw materials used in the study were peels from mangoes, pineapples, and a mix of mango and pineapple. Each of these were used in the fermentation process, which was performed in separately packed 200-liter plastic covered containers. While the peels fermented, the researchers observed and monitored progress every two months for a total of six months. Once the six months were up, the resulting wines were packaged in 300 ml bottles, all labeled and put into crates where they belonged.

The main thing that the researchers got from their study was that, by using fruit peels to make wine, they could create something that’s higher in quality than what local competitors are producing, and that they could do it for a fraction of the production costs. That’s because fruit peels are ultimately a cheap – if not free – source of raw materials for their product. They conclude their study by saying that “the price of wine from such materials will be quite lower than that from local competitors especially with good marketing and consistence in quality.” That makes it economically feasible. (Related: 14 Fabulous Uses & Benefits Of Leftover Lemon Peels.)

As for the health benefits, it is well-known that wine possesses many of them, some of which are protection against obesity, diabetes, high cholesterol, and blood clots. Wine is also known to help with weight loss, as well as contribute to overall health with its anti-aging properties. It’s clear that the researchers have struck gold with the results of their research here, where they are not only helping to clean up the environment, but also aiding in new ways to keep people healthier.

Sources include:

AJFAnd.net[PDF]

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Now 10 cases of measles diagnosed in B.C. outbreak, vaccinations way up

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VANCOUVER — Two new cases of measles have been diagnosed in the Vancouver area for a total of 10 illnesses as health officials say they’re concerned they can’t find the source of one of the infections.

Vancouver Coastal medical health officer Dr. Althea Hayden says nine of the cases are clearly associated with schools that were at the centre of the original outbreak this month, but they don’t know where the other person contracted the disease.

The health authority has also released a list of locations where one of the infected people travelled over three days from Feb. 15 to Feb. 18, including restaurants, on a Canada Line commuter train and Langara College.

Hayden says the health authority is doing its best to find the source of measles in the 10th person in an effort to prevent more people from being exposed.

Measles at first presents with flu-like symptoms, coughing, a runny nose and red eyes, but then a fever develops, followed by the distinctive rash.

Hayden says the response to a call for people to get vaccinated has been fantastic and the health authority has seen a large number of first-time vaccinations.

“It’s the best thing that people can do to protect themselves, it’s the best thing we all can do to protect our community.”

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Students with ADHD less likely to enrol in post-secondary education, study says

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Danielle Edwards, The Canadian Press


Published Friday, February 22, 2019 2:58PM EST

OTTAWA — Students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely to go to college or university than those with no long-term health conditions, according to a new report from Statistics Canada.

The gap suggests teachers need better training in how to work with students whose behaviour can come off as disruptive and who might seem uninterested in their studies, advocates say.

“They are going to have one to three kids with ADHD in every class they teach for the rest of their career, and this is just regular classrooms, yet we’re not training them,” said Heidi Bernhardt, the executive director of the Centre for ADHD Awareness.

Researchers found that young people with neither a mental-health nor a neurodevelopmental disorder, 77 per cent had enrolled in a post-secondary program.

Only 48 per cent of Canadians between 18 and 22 years old who had a diagnosed mental-health condition had enrolled in a post-secondary institution. That includes students diagnosed with emotional, psychological or nervous conditions, but nearly three-quarters of this group were diagnosed with ADHD, which is considered a mental illness.

The researchers found 60 per cent of youth diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders enrolled, including people with epilepsy, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities.

Among young adults with both a mental-health and a neurodevelopmental condition, 36 per cent had enrolled in higher education.

The report used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, as well as some data from income-tax returns.

Educators may misinterpret the symptoms of ADHD as bad behaviour, leaving students discouraged about learning and more prone to dropping out of high school, said Bernhardt. She said students with ADHD and no additional learning disabilities score eight to 10 per cent lower in math and reading.

Andrew King, director of communications at the Canadian Teachers’ Federation, said there is no data on the number of teachers across the country who are trained in supporting students with special needs.

Bernhardt also said supports for students with ADHD are inconsistent across provinces.

Ontario has a system for identifying “exceptionalities” for students that divides disorders into five different categories, including autism and intellectual disabilities. ADHD isn’t on that list.

Dr. Philippe Robaey, head of the ADHD team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, said learning organizational skills is the biggest challenge facing students with the disorder, which can be difficult when they struggle with staying focused on one task.

“When I see kids with ADHD, what they often will say is that ‘I’m stupid.’ Of course they are not, this is the perception they may just develop about themselves, but they are not able to do things so they can develop very poor self-esteem and not believe in what they can do.”

Robaey said setting students with ADHD up for success starts with individualized learning plans and access to specialized classrooms and teachers who are equipped to encourage youth with special needs.

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New biological batteries use energy inspired by electric eels, could be used on next-gen robots, bio-implants

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(Natural News) Battery technology is constantly improving, despite there being only fair coverage about it on the news. Unless you’re specifically looking for what’s new in the world of rechargeable batteries, you aren’t likely to find a lot of information. But there are many experts around the world who are currently working on improving the…

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