Connect with us

Health

Eating ultra-processed foods can increase risk of early death: study

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

A major French study published Monday has found for the first time a link between the consumption of ultra-processed foods and a higher risk of death, but researchers warned more work was needed to determine which mechanisms were at play.

The study, which involved monitoring the diets of tens of thousands of French people between 2009 and 2017, found a modest link between increased consumption of ultra-processed foods — characterized as ready-to-eat or -heat formulations — and a heightened mortality risk during that period.

The results were published in JAMA Internal Medicine published by the American Medical Association.

But “we shouldn’t be alarmist, or say that eating a packaged meal gives you a 15-per cent higher chance of dying,” cautioned Mathilde Touvier, director of the nutritional epidemiology research team at Paris 13 University, which managed the NutriNet-Sante study along with teams from Inserm, Inra and CNAM.

“It’s another step in our understanding of the link between ultra-processed food and health,” she added.

The relationship between diet and disease is complex and the results of studies are frequently misinterpreted.

Last year, the same French team published a study on organic food and how it related to the risk of cancer.

A higher rate of cancer was found in people who ate less organic food — but the study did not conclude there was a causal link — though that did not stop many media outlets from headlining the cancer-fighting effects of organic food.

Some 45,000 people over the age of 45, a majority of whom were women, took part in the latest study. Every six months, they were asked to fill out three online surveys, randomly assigned over two weeks, on everything they ate or drank over a 24-hour period.

After seven years, about 600 people died. The researchers then crunched the numbers and found that a 10 percent increase in the proportion of ultra-processed foods in the diet corresponded to a 15 per cent increase in mortality.

But Touvier warned that rather than focus on the figure, what matters is the existence of a statistically significant correlation — and the study is one part of growing body of work on the matter.

Ultra-processed foods come under group four of the NOVA food classification system recognized by health agencies including the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.

They have undergone several transformation processes including heating at high temperatures and the presence of additives, emulsifiers and texturizers. Many ready-to-heat products that are rich in salt or sugar and low in vitamins and fiber fall under this category.

Last year, French researchers published results from the same NutriNet-Sante study, observing more cancers among heavy consumers of these foods.

Since it is not possible for ethical reasons to conduct a controlled experiment in which one group eats ultra-processed foods and the other does not, observational studies are the only option.

But they are inevitably flawed, hinging on accurate self-reporting, while there are also a myriad of other “invisible” factors at play — even though the results are adjusted to compensate for socio-demographic criteria and the overall quality of the diet.

The burning question remains, what is it about these foods that causes negative impacts on health?

One popular hypothesis is the presence of additives, which have been studied in lab conditions on cells and on rats, notably by the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA)

The study is “an important contribution to the literature” on the subject, Casey Rebholz, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health told AFP, who noted the methodology was robust despite the inherent limitations of studies of this nature.

Another vital message to take away is that such foods are disproportionally consumed by lower-income people, argued Professor Nita Forouhi of Cambridge University’s School of Clinical Medicine.

“Consumption of highly processed foods reflects social inequalities — they are consumed disproportionately more by individuals with lower incomes or education levels, or those living alone,” she said.

“Such foods are attractive because they tend to be cheaper, are highly palatable due to high sugar, salt and saturated fat content, are widely available … More needs to be done to address these inequalities.”

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Health

Now 10 cases of measles diagnosed in B.C. outbreak, vaccinations way up

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

VANCOUVER — Two new cases of measles have been diagnosed in the Vancouver area for a total of 10 illnesses as health officials say they’re concerned they can’t find the source of one of the infections.

Vancouver Coastal medical health officer Dr. Althea Hayden says nine of the cases are clearly associated with schools that were at the centre of the original outbreak this month, but they don’t know where the other person contracted the disease.

The health authority has also released a list of locations where one of the infected people travelled over three days from Feb. 15 to Feb. 18, including restaurants, on a Canada Line commuter train and Langara College.

Hayden says the health authority is doing its best to find the source of measles in the 10th person in an effort to prevent more people from being exposed.

Measles at first presents with flu-like symptoms, coughing, a runny nose and red eyes, but then a fever develops, followed by the distinctive rash.

Hayden says the response to a call for people to get vaccinated has been fantastic and the health authority has seen a large number of first-time vaccinations.

“It’s the best thing that people can do to protect themselves, it’s the best thing we all can do to protect our community.”

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Health

Students with ADHD less likely to enrol in post-secondary education, study says

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

Danielle Edwards, The Canadian Press


Published Friday, February 22, 2019 2:58PM EST

OTTAWA — Students with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are much less likely to go to college or university than those with no long-term health conditions, according to a new report from Statistics Canada.

The gap suggests teachers need better training in how to work with students whose behaviour can come off as disruptive and who might seem uninterested in their studies, advocates say.

“They are going to have one to three kids with ADHD in every class they teach for the rest of their career, and this is just regular classrooms, yet we’re not training them,” said Heidi Bernhardt, the executive director of the Centre for ADHD Awareness.

Researchers found that young people with neither a mental-health nor a neurodevelopmental disorder, 77 per cent had enrolled in a post-secondary program.

Only 48 per cent of Canadians between 18 and 22 years old who had a diagnosed mental-health condition had enrolled in a post-secondary institution. That includes students diagnosed with emotional, psychological or nervous conditions, but nearly three-quarters of this group were diagnosed with ADHD, which is considered a mental illness.

The researchers found 60 per cent of youth diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders enrolled, including people with epilepsy, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities or learning disabilities.

Among young adults with both a mental-health and a neurodevelopmental condition, 36 per cent had enrolled in higher education.

The report used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, as well as some data from income-tax returns.

Educators may misinterpret the symptoms of ADHD as bad behaviour, leaving students discouraged about learning and more prone to dropping out of high school, said Bernhardt. She said students with ADHD and no additional learning disabilities score eight to 10 per cent lower in math and reading.

Andrew King, director of communications at the Canadian Teachers’ Federation, said there is no data on the number of teachers across the country who are trained in supporting students with special needs.

Bernhardt also said supports for students with ADHD are inconsistent across provinces.

Ontario has a system for identifying “exceptionalities” for students that divides disorders into five different categories, including autism and intellectual disabilities. ADHD isn’t on that list.

Dr. Philippe Robaey, head of the ADHD team at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, said learning organizational skills is the biggest challenge facing students with the disorder, which can be difficult when they struggle with staying focused on one task.

“When I see kids with ADHD, what they often will say is that ‘I’m stupid.’ Of course they are not, this is the perception they may just develop about themselves, but they are not able to do things so they can develop very poor self-esteem and not believe in what they can do.”

Robaey said setting students with ADHD up for success starts with individualized learning plans and access to specialized classrooms and teachers who are equipped to encourage youth with special needs.

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Health

New biological batteries use energy inspired by electric eels, could be used on next-gen robots, bio-implants

Editor

Published

on

By

[ad_1]

(Natural News) Battery technology is constantly improving, despite there being only fair coverage about it on the news. Unless you’re specifically looking for what’s new in the world of rechargeable batteries, you aren’t likely to find a lot of information. But there are many experts around the world who are currently working on improving the…

Read More

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending