Connect with us

Travel & Escape

Flights: Plane passengers NEVER want to see this boarding pass code – it’s bad news | Travel News | Travel

Editor

Published

on

[ad_1]

Flights are booked with the full expectation that the passenger will be able to turn up, sit in their plane seat and jet off to their destination. However, an airline insider has revealed that sometimes this is not always the case. An Air Canada ticket agent has come forward to state there’s one code that passengers never want to find on their boarding pass. The code “GTE” on a boarding pass means that the flight has been oversold – and you do not have a seat.

The revelation was made by the former Air Canada worker to CBC after he decided to go public because he wanted the public to know how often staff need to find passengers’ seat when flights are oversold.

“If someone has GTE (for ‘gate’) on their boarding pass, it means they don’t have a seat,” the ticket agent worker told CBC. “I train people to dupe passengers.”

He added: “I really wasn’t able to tell people exactly what was going on and give them the full picture. They were strict about that. We’re trained to tell them that … they have nothing to worry about.”

The employee said he had to direct travellers to gates with the full knowledge that there was no seat waiting for them on the plane to avoid upsetting them.

The issue was the same whether fliers were travelling within Canada, to the US or overseas, the former Air Canada agent said.

He claims he quit the job because he could no longer deal with the stress of constantly lying to travellers.

Airlines are permitted to sell more plane tickets for a flight than there are seats in order to maximise revenues.

However, Air Canada has come under fire for being less transparent with its customers.

According to CBC, Air Canada says the practice of overselling is carefully managed, and employees are trained to be transparent with customers.

Passengers who have found themselves without a seat as a result of this code on their boarding pass took to Twitter to share their experience.

“I remember having a boarding pass with GTE on it. Had no idea what it meant,” one person tweeted.

“Waiting in the boarding area my name was called. Went to the gate rep, she took my pass, then gave one back with a seat number on it. Guess someone cancelled. I paid full fare but was really on stand-by.”

Air Canada spokeswoman Angela Mah disagreed with the allegations when contacted by CBC.

“Overselling… accounts for less than one per cent of passengers booked,” Mah said in an email.

The one per cent amounts to 510,000 tickets oversold, but Mah claimed only a fraction of that number ends in customers being denied boarding because “several million customers per year no-show.”

She said overselling is approved by the Canadian Transportation Agency and is a “common practice amongst many international network airlines to ensure the maximum number of seats are filled on a departing flight.”

Overselling “benefits customers by keeping fares lower” and allows the airline to operate less-travelled routes, Mah said.

Express.co.uk has contacted Air Canada for further comment on the practice of overselling.

For travellers intrigued by the codes on their boarding passes, this is what some others mean and whether they spell good or and news

[ad_2]

Source link

قالب وردپرس

Travel & Escape

48 hours in . . . Bruges, an insider guide to Belgium’s city on water

Editor

Published

on

By

Little Bruges, the perfect pocket-sized medieval city, was a Sleeping Beauty. Laced with canals, it was one of the great North European trading ports in late medieval times. The magnificently detailed paintings of its artists, such as Jan van Eyck and Hans Memling, record its wealth in clothing, jewellery and ornament. Then it fell rapidly into decline and slept until rediscovered and restored to glory in the 19th century.

Today its new riches are in tourism, carefully managed and constantly refreshed by year-round cultural events, so that it retains the dynamism of a living city. The best way to appreciate all this is to stay a few days, luxuriating in the dreamily romantic boutique hotels, and visiting the rewarding museums and churches at your leisure. Above all, this is a place to walk and wonder, and there are still plenty of quiet corners to discover, where historic Bruges sleeps on.

Continue Reading

Travel & Escape

Europe’s most incredible cosy cabins for watching the Northern Lights

Editor

Published

on

By

The Northern Lights are a phenomenon likely to appear on the wish, bucket or to-do list of any intrepid traveller. And what better way to experience them in Europe than by bunking down in cosy cabins, surrounded by miles of forest, still water or the peaks of mountains. They might be pared-back but still boast polished elements, whether it’s a heated hot tub in Sweden, an ‘igloo’ extension in Norway or a glass roof above your bed in Finland. Nothing distracts as the Aurora Borealis flames across the sky – curl up under a blanket and take a look inside. . .

Continue Reading

Travel & Escape

The curious idiosyncrasies of the Icelandic, from elves and nudity to dark jokes and shark meat

Editor

Published

on

By

Iceland: the land of fire and ice, home to long winters, pickled foodstuff and perhaps the world’s most confounding alphabet. Considering a trip there? Arm yourself first with five of its more curious cultural quirks…

They believe in elves. Sort of

… at the very least, the ancient mysticism around them remains alive and well. According to an oft-quoted survey conducted by the University of Iceland, nearly 10 per cent of citizens actually believe elves to be real, while more than 80 per cent are on the fence but refuse to deny their existence.

Continue Reading

Chat

Trending