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Facebook’s Open Compute Project hits over $2.5 billion in revenues

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The Open Compute Project began its life at Facebook as a revolutionary idea to do for data center hardware what Linux and open source software did for the software market. In other words, the OCP comes up with cutting-edge, super-efficient designs that any company can use to build their own hardware.

And the OCP has succeeded, by most reasonable metrics. The project has created a fanatical following among data center engineers, and has led to the creation of products in 10 categories, including networking, servers, and storage.

And in terms of dollars and cents: On Thursday, the preliminary results of a new market assessment report commissioned by OCP was released. That report finds that companies spent more than $2.5 billion on OCP-designed products in, up from $1.16 billion year the before.

Read: AT&T signed an ‘8-digit’ deal that isn’t good news for VMware, Cisco, or Huawei — but could be great for Google Cloud

And this report doesn’t actually reveal the true amount being spent on OCP gear.

It deliberately hides what the project’s board member companies are spending on their OCP equipment, which includes Facebook, Goldman Sachs, Intel, Microsoft and Rackspace. Those companies run enormous data centers and buy a lot of data center equipment, meaning the real figure is likely higher.

The reason the board members are excluded is to try and show that the project is having an impact beyond the handful of companies in leadership roles — although it’s a bit coy of the organization to keep mum on how much money those companies pour into the ecosystem.

Even so, the commissioned report makes a fair case that OCP is creating a multi-billion market.

Excluding the purchases of board members, OCP products account for nearly 1% of the total data center market, which it pegs at $127 billion, the report says.

Interestingly, the report also finds that the overall data center equipment market is shrinking, from $137 billion in 2017 to $127 billion in 2018. Companies across the board are reducing their use of private data centers, as their use of the cloud increases. And OCP includes many of the big cloud providers that are taking those workloads, including Microsoft, Google and Rackspace.

Simply put, that means that OCP has been eating the data center market in a measurable way.

Engineers love it

OCP’s goal is to take the power out of the hands of traditional server and networking vendors like Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Dell, or Cisco, and put it into the hands of the companies who buy and use that hardware.

While all three of those companies have joined the project, OCP members design their own servers, storage, and networking gear, making them cost less and perform faster than traditional commercial alternatives. Then, they share their designs for free. Anyone can modify those designs for their own use, or share them with the group.

Attendees at the OCP Summit conference
OCP

Engineers love it. They get to freely collaborate with other top engineers trying to solve the same problems without worrying about protecting intellectual property or trade secrets.

Contract manufactures are available to build the gear, too, to make it easier for even smaller companies to take advantage of OCP gear.

OCP has also become such a big thing that a growing list of vendors, including HPE and Dell, also make commercial products that match OCP specifications. So OCP-designed products can be bought off-the-shelf. They don’t have to be custom-ordered, lowering the bar to entry.

Next up: the telecom industry

With a loyal following of data center engineers, OCP and Facebook have moved on to a related industry: telecom equipment.

Through OCP, telecom providers like AT&T and Deutsche Telekom are working on open source designs for routers and the other equipment that run their networks. This is gear that would challenge networking giants including Cisco and Juniper.

A few years ago, Facebook also launched a telecom-specific organization called the Telecom Infra Project. It is working on projects like open source telecom radio transmitters. This is gear that would take on the likes of Ericsson, Nokia and Huawei at this especially critical time, when telcos are upgrading their networks to 5G.

Meanwhile, the telecom industry has also decided that it wanted to lead its own open-source hardware project, away from Facebook.

A project called the O-RAN Alliance has gained steam, and includes a who’s who of the major telecom companies worldwide. This includes AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, Sprint, SoftBank, SK Telecom, Telefónica, and others.

The industry scuttlebutt is that the two groups, TIP and O-RAN, are going to announce some sort of collaboration next week at Mobile World Congress so they don’t duplicate efforts as they work to to upend the global telecom equipment industry.

Read: Bill Gates warns of the dangers of cow farts — and the world should take his words seriously

Amy Wheelus, AT&T VP of Network Cloud & Infrastructure heads Airship
YouTube/TelecomTV

OCP’s market research report doesn’t shed much light on how much money the telecos might shift to these new open source creations.

But it does show that telecom companies are one of the major users of OCP gear — including servers, storage and OCP’s optical networking equipment.

Meanwhile AT&T has taken open source even further. It’s leading a project called Airship to share software that it’s building to run and manage its 5G network. This software can be used for lots of other data center needs at all sorts of other companies.

The radical idea that launched OCP is turning into a full-fledged hardware industry coup.

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More groups join in support of women in STEM program at Carleton

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OTTAWA — Major companies and government partners are lending their support to Carleton University’s newly established Women in Engineering and Information Technology Program.

The list of supporters includes Mississauga-based construction company EllisDon.

The latest to announce their support for the program also include BlackBerry QNX, CIRA (Canadian Internet Registration Authority), Ericsson, Nokia, Solace, Trend Micro, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, CGI, Gastops, Leonardo DRS, Lockheed Martin Canada, Amdocs and Ross.

The program is officially set to launch this September.

It is being led by Carleton’s Faculty of Engineering and Design with the goal of establishing meaningful partnerships in support of women in STEM.  

The program will host events for women students to build relationships with industry and government partners, create mentorship opportunities, as well as establish a special fund to support allies at Carleton in meeting equity, diversity and inclusion goals.

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VR tech to revolutionize commercial driver training

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Serious Labs seems to have found a way from tragedy to triumph? The Edmonton-based firm designs and manufactures virtual reality simulators to standardize training programs for operators of heavy equipment such as aerial lifts, cranes, forklifts, and commercial trucks. These simulators enable operators to acquire and practice operational skills for the job safety and efficiency in a risk-free virtual environment so they can work more safely and efficiently.

The 2018 Humboldt bus catastrophe sent shock waves across the industry. The tragedy highlighted the need for standardized commercial driver training and testing. It also contributed to the acceleration of the federal government implementing a Mandatory Entry-Level Training (MELT) program for Class 1 & 2 drivers currently being adopted across Canada. MELT is a much more rigorous standard that promotes safety and in-depth practice for new drivers.

Enter Serious Labs. By proposing to harness the power of virtual reality (VR), Serious Labs has earned considerable funding to develop a VR commercial truck driving simulator.

The Government of Alberta has awarded $1 million, and Emissions Reduction Alberta (ERA) is contributing an additional $2 million for the simulator development. Commercial deployment is estimated to begin in 2024, with the simulator to be made available across Canada and the United States, and with the Alberta Motor Transport Association (AMTA) helping to provide simulator tests to certify that driver trainees have attained the appropriate standard. West Tech Report recently took the opportunity to chat with Serious Labs CEO, Jim Colvin, about the environmental and labour benefits of VR Driver Training, as well as the unique way that Colvin went from angel investor to CEO of the company.

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Next-Gen Tech Company Pops on New Cover Detection Test

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While the world comes out of the initial stages of the pandemic, COVID-19 will be continue to be a threat for some time to come. Companies, such as Zen Graphene, are working on ways to detect the virus and its variants and are on the forefronts of technology.

Nanotechnology firm ZEN Graphene Solutions Ltd. (TSX-Venture:ZEN) (OTCPK:ZENYF), is working to develop technology to help detect the COVID-19 virus and its variants. The firm signed an exclusive agreement with McMaster University to be the global commercializing partner for a newly developed aptamer-based, SARS-CoV-2 rapid detection technology.

This patent-pending technology uses clinical samples from patients and was funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The test is considered extremely accurate, scalable, saliva-based, affordable, and provides results in under 10 minutes.

Shares were trading up over 5% to $3.07 in early afternoon trade.

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