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‘Pay heed’ to words of top bureacrat on SNC-Lavalin affair, Trudeau says

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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says Canadians should “pay heed” to the country’s top civil servant, who testified Thursday there was no inappropriate pressure put on Jody Wilson-Raybould to override a decision to prosecute SNC-Lavalin.

Taking questions from reporters after an event in St. John’s today, Trudeau called Privy Council Office clerk Michael Wernick an “extraordinary public servant” who has served Canada with “integrity and brilliance.”

Wernick told the justice committee probing the SNC-Lavalin affair that he warned Wilson-Raybould, justice minister at the time, there would be economic “consequences” to prosecuting SNC-Lavalin, including big job losses. But he maintained there was never any undue pressure from himself, Trudeau or officials with the Prime Minister’s Office.

Asked why Wernick and PMO officials kept pressing Wilson-Raybould on what was at stake after the decision had been made to proceed with prosecution, Trudeau said the government has a fundamental responsibility to preserve jobs and promote economic growth while respecting the rule of law and an independent judiciary.

“That is something this government has always done,” he said. “I would recommend that people pay close heed to the words of the clerk of the Privy Council. His service to this country over decades in the public service leaves him well-positioned to understand what institutions are grounded in, and make sure that we’re doing the right things as a government.”

The Public Prosecution Service advised SNC-Lavalin on Sept. 4, 2018, it would negotiate with the company on a Deferred Prosecution Agreement, which would have applied alternative penalties in order to avoid criminal proceedings against the Quebec-based global engineering firm for bribery and fraud charges related to contracts in Libya.

Wernick said he called the then justice minister and attorney general on Dec. 19, 2018, to discuss various issues — including the option of a remediation agreement.

During that call, Wernick said he spoke of the implications of prosecuting the company for employees, suppliers and communities. He said he told Wilson-Raybould that the prime minister and “a lot of her colleagues” were anxious about what they were hearing and reading in business media — articles warning that the company could close down or move if criminal proceedings went ahead.

Pressured to ‘get it right’

“I am quite sure the minister felt pressured to get it right, and part of my conversation with her on Dec. 19 was conveying context that there were a lot of people worried about what would happen … the consequences not for her, the consequences for the workers, and the communities and the suppliers,” he told MPs on Thursday.

Wernick said he did not cross any line in his exchanges with Wilson-Raybould, insisting the conversations were “lawful and appropriate.”

The justice committee is examining the growing controversy touched off by a Feb. 7 Globe and Mail report that Trudeau’s aides attempted to press Wilson-Raybould, while attorney general, to intervene in the prosecution of SNC-Lavalin, and that exasperation with her lack of co-operation was one reason for shuffling her out of the Justice portfolio.

Former attorney general Jody Wilson-Raybould is expected to testify at the Commons justice committee next week. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Wilson-Raybould has remained silent on the issue, citing solicitor-client privilege. This week, she told the House of Commons that privilege is not hers to waive, and she hopes she is able to speak her “truth.”

Opposition Conservatives and NDP have been demanding the prime minister waive privilege so Wilson-Raybould can speak freely when she appears before the committee, expected next week.

Wernick said Thursday he doesn’t believe she is bound by solicitor-client privilege, but Trudeau repeated again, on Friday, that there are serious implications at play.

“This is something we do have to take very seriously because it’s a fundamental part of our justice system and indeed in this case there are two ongoing court cases,” he said.

Wilson-Raybould’s successor, Justice Minister and Attorney General David Lametti, is reviewing the matter, but has offered no timeline of when he could provide advice to the prime minister on privilege.

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Biometric Vaccines Are Here Preceding Forced Digital ID

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The future of vaccines is here, just in time for the coming forced digital ID. This isn’t some sci-fi movie based on some conspiracy theorists’ idea of Revelation where every living being is required to be tagged. Biometric vaccines are real, are in use and have been deployed in the United States.

Biometric vaccines are immunizations laced with digital biometrics, created from merging the tech industry with big pharma. This new form of vaccine injects microchips into the body creating a global ID matrix to track and control every person. Not only has this satanic system already been rolled out, billions may already have been injected unaware.

ID2020 Alliance, a program aimed at chipping every person on earth, has collaborated with GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations) to inject these microchips into the body through immunization. 

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How to get more of everything you love about Ottawa

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We love Ottawa, and we want to help you make the most of living in the capital.

Ottawa Magazine is launching a new membership program, with front-of-the-line access to events, special offers at cultural institutions, and exclusive access to one-of-a-kind food and drink experiences at the city’s best restaurants. And of course, a subscription to our award-winning magazine.

Basically, everything you love about the city… just more of it.

Sign up for more information now and you’ll be one of the first to hear when memberships go on sale!

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Where to Live Now: A data-driven look at Ottawa neighbourhoods

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What does community have to do with buying a house? Do people really want friendly neighbours, or do they just want the most square footage for their buck?

In The Village Effect: How Face-to-Face Contact Can Make Us Healthier, Happier and Smarter, Montreal psychologist Susan Pinker cited a 2010 study conducted at Brigham Young University in Idaho that analyzed relationship data for more than 300,000 people over nearly eight years. She discovered that people who were integrated into their communities had half the risk of dying during that time as those who led more solitary lives. In Pinker’s analysis, integration meant simple interactions such as exchanging baked goods, babysitting, borrowing tools, and spur-of-the-moment visits — exactly the kinds of exchanges we saw grow when COVID-19 forced us all to stay home.

For this year’s real estate feature in the Spring/Summer 2020 print edition, we crunched the numbers to find the neighbourhoods where we think you’re most likely to find such opportunities for engagement. Using data available through the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study (ONS), we chose six indicators that we believed would attract those looking to connect with the people around them. Omitting rural areas, we awarded points to each neighbourhood according to where it landed in the ranking. (In the event of a tie, we used a secondary indicator of the same theme to refine the ranking.) You’ll find the ten neighbourhoods that performed the best according to those six indicators listed below, along with resident profiles and notable destinations in each ’hood — though many have been forced to adapt to COVID-19, most are offering delivery and/or take-out, and we are hopeful they will resume normal operations once it is safe to do so.

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