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Ottawa author Liliana Hoton Releases Inspirational Little Cricky Children’s Book

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Writers get excited when their books are translated to other languages. This is because writers want their works widely read. Lots of novels have been translated but only few children’s book has enjoyed similar favour. Little Cricky, originally written by Domnita Georgescu-Moldoveanu recently got translated to English by Liliana Hoton and Miruna Nistor.  The interesting part is that Little Cricky is a story in verse, and the versification shows in the English translation as well.

Domnita Georgescu-Moldoveanu left her country during the time of communism to settle in France. It was there that she wrote the majority of her works notwithstanding she was a member of the Writer’s Union from Romania. Until her demise in Paris in 2013, she tried a whole lot of genre, from news to poems to novels to children’s tales. Upon her death, her sister, Natalia Georgescu-Moldoveanu, who lives in Ottawa, continued to extend her legacy by continuing to publish her books.

The treasures on the pages of Little Cricky

The book is about the journey of little cricket in search of his violin that was stolen by the winter wind. Every page of Little Cricky holds a unique feeling for children. This beautiful book is able to transport children through a diverse emotional journey: anger, anticipation, expectation, joy, love, and sadness. These feelings are what little children recall with fondness later in life. Childhood is an important time in life and Little Cricky is one of the beautiful books that evoke strong feelings and adds value to this stage of life.

 ‘Never give up’ isthe priceless lesson reechoed on every page of the book. No doubt, everyone needs this reminder as we sail through the stormy waters of life, particularly children. Little Cricket also extols other universal values like courage, friendship, happiness, loyalty, passion, and the beauty of the soul.

Comparing Little Cricky to other children books

It wouldn’t come as a surprise to have Little Cricky shortlisted for the TD Canadian Children’s Literature Award. No doubt, this is the most coveted award in Canadian children’s literature with a prize of $50,000. The shortlisted stories have one thing in common besides being written for kids of up to 12 years; they evoke more than a single emotion, which is the case with Little Cricky.

One of the books shortlisted for the 2018 award was Nokum Is My Teacher, written by David Bouchard and illustrated by Allen Sapp. Like Little Cricky, the boy in this book had a taste for adventure. The boy asks his Nokum (grandmother) a lot of questions about what life outside their community feels like. For the boy, it became a struggle between fitting into life and respecting tradition, just as for Little Cricky it is a struggle to be without his violin.

Little Cricky also has a lot in common with Little You, written by Richard Van Camp illustrated by Julie Flett,which reminds us about the strengths and vulnerabilities of beings small, and about the childlike innocence that makes us dare to be someone great. Little You also talks about the power of having the support of family and community from a tender age and about the importance of being loved unconditionally, the same issues that Little Cricky touches along the story. Other children’s book on the 2018 award list are How Raven Stole the Sun, Fatty Legs, and Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox– All having an animal as the main character, just like Little Cricky has insects as protagonists. Which also makes it an insects mini-dictionary for kids. Little Cricky is currently available at Agora Books and you would definitely want to add it to your reading list.

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Biometric Vaccines Are Here Preceding Forced Digital ID

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The future of vaccines is here, just in time for the coming forced digital ID. This isn’t some sci-fi movie based on some conspiracy theorists’ idea of Revelation where every living being is required to be tagged. Biometric vaccines are real, are in use and have been deployed in the United States.

Biometric vaccines are immunizations laced with digital biometrics, created from merging the tech industry with big pharma. This new form of vaccine injects microchips into the body creating a global ID matrix to track and control every person. Not only has this satanic system already been rolled out, billions may already have been injected unaware.

ID2020 Alliance, a program aimed at chipping every person on earth, has collaborated with GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations) to inject these microchips into the body through immunization. 

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How to get more of everything you love about Ottawa

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We love Ottawa, and we want to help you make the most of living in the capital.

Ottawa Magazine is launching a new membership program, with front-of-the-line access to events, special offers at cultural institutions, and exclusive access to one-of-a-kind food and drink experiences at the city’s best restaurants. And of course, a subscription to our award-winning magazine.

Basically, everything you love about the city… just more of it.

Sign up for more information now and you’ll be one of the first to hear when memberships go on sale!

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Where to Live Now: A data-driven look at Ottawa neighbourhoods

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What does community have to do with buying a house? Do people really want friendly neighbours, or do they just want the most square footage for their buck?

In The Village Effect: How Face-to-Face Contact Can Make Us Healthier, Happier and Smarter, Montreal psychologist Susan Pinker cited a 2010 study conducted at Brigham Young University in Idaho that analyzed relationship data for more than 300,000 people over nearly eight years. She discovered that people who were integrated into their communities had half the risk of dying during that time as those who led more solitary lives. In Pinker’s analysis, integration meant simple interactions such as exchanging baked goods, babysitting, borrowing tools, and spur-of-the-moment visits — exactly the kinds of exchanges we saw grow when COVID-19 forced us all to stay home.

For this year’s real estate feature in the Spring/Summer 2020 print edition, we crunched the numbers to find the neighbourhoods where we think you’re most likely to find such opportunities for engagement. Using data available through the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study (ONS), we chose six indicators that we believed would attract those looking to connect with the people around them. Omitting rural areas, we awarded points to each neighbourhood according to where it landed in the ranking. (In the event of a tie, we used a secondary indicator of the same theme to refine the ranking.) You’ll find the ten neighbourhoods that performed the best according to those six indicators listed below, along with resident profiles and notable destinations in each ’hood — though many have been forced to adapt to COVID-19, most are offering delivery and/or take-out, and we are hopeful they will resume normal operations once it is safe to do so.

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