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Kids weigh in on Ottawa’s 2046 plan

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Ottawa is coming up with a new official plan — the legal document that governs how the city grows — and the kids have something to say about it.

In February, the city announced it’s aiming to make Ottawa one of North America’s most livable mid-sized cities by 2046.

The city wants to have the blueprint ready for 2021, with the goal of making Ottawa more attractive to younger workers as the city competes in a world where economic activity is concentrated in a shrinking number of large urban areas.

Kate Herron, a Grade 5 teacher at Half Moon Bay Public School, tasked her class with coming up with their own ideas for how they’d like to see their city grow.Oops…

We’re sorry, this content is not available in your location. If you believe you have received this message in error please contact us Error 21 City councillors are asking kids for ideas about Ottawa’s future. Hallie Cotnam dropped by Half Moon Bay Public School in Barrhaven and met 10-year-olds from Kate Herron’s Grade 5 class. 6:46

Lily Morin

Lily Morin said the city needs to be a bit more proactive when it comes to plastic waste, pointing out how cities in California are trying to solve the problem.

“When I go grocery shopping I see plastic bags in trees and I see coke bottles everywhere. If that’s happening now, it could get better or it could get worse,” she said. 

As an avid singer, Morin said she’s also looking forward to seeing how music has evolved by 2046.

“People won’t use as many instruments. I feel like it will be more techy,” she predicted.

Katie Roberts and Cooper Pears

Katie Roberts and Cooper Pears were part of a group that focused on what Ottawans will be doing for fun in 2046.

Roberts predicted hockey and soccer will still be staples in Ottawa, but she expects new sports to come into play, too.

“Maybe they’ll join two sports like basketball and lacrosse. That would just be an idea,” she said.

Pears thinks the players will likely be robots, although he doesn’t know if that will be an improvement.

“A robot might not be able to beat Wayne Gretzky,” he acknowledged, but on the other hand, “they’d never get injuries so they could be good.” 

Bella Czudner and Aileen Zhang

One sport there might be less of in Ottawa is golf, according to Aileen Zhang and Bella Czudner.

“We might need to destroy more golf courses to add more houses,” Zhang said.

Another housing option the group came up with would see Ottawa become a real-life version of The Shire, where homes are moved underground.

“I think it’s a good idea because then there will be more room for things up top,” Czudner said.

Caitlyn Bird, Bernice Lu and Jake Smith

Caitlyn Bird, Jake Smith and Bernice Lu worry there will be less room for kids to play.

“The houses will probably be packed together a lot more. So front yards and backyards — there won’t be as many,” Smith said.

We’ll need more houses because there will be more people working from home, the group reasoned.

“Since now we have the technology, we’re able to work at home,” Bird said.

Lu believes more people will be working in the auto industry as self-driving cars make their way to Ottawa.

Ashley Brydges, Gavin Landry and Hayyan Affan

Speaking of self-driving cars, Ashley Brydges, Hayyan Affan and Gavin Landry looked at how transportation might change in the future.

If more people are driving, Affan said Ottawa will need more room.

“There’s going to have to be bigger roads,” he said.

For sidewalks, Ottawa should consider moving walkways like the ones at airports instead of sidewalks, Landry said.

“It would go faster and be less dangerous,” Brydges agreed.

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Biometric Vaccines Are Here Preceding Forced Digital ID

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The future of vaccines is here, just in time for the coming forced digital ID. This isn’t some sci-fi movie based on some conspiracy theorists’ idea of Revelation where every living being is required to be tagged. Biometric vaccines are real, are in use and have been deployed in the United States.

Biometric vaccines are immunizations laced with digital biometrics, created from merging the tech industry with big pharma. This new form of vaccine injects microchips into the body creating a global ID matrix to track and control every person. Not only has this satanic system already been rolled out, billions may already have been injected unaware.

ID2020 Alliance, a program aimed at chipping every person on earth, has collaborated with GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations) to inject these microchips into the body through immunization. 

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How to get more of everything you love about Ottawa

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We love Ottawa, and we want to help you make the most of living in the capital.

Ottawa Magazine is launching a new membership program, with front-of-the-line access to events, special offers at cultural institutions, and exclusive access to one-of-a-kind food and drink experiences at the city’s best restaurants. And of course, a subscription to our award-winning magazine.

Basically, everything you love about the city… just more of it.

Sign up for more information now and you’ll be one of the first to hear when memberships go on sale!

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Where to Live Now: A data-driven look at Ottawa neighbourhoods

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What does community have to do with buying a house? Do people really want friendly neighbours, or do they just want the most square footage for their buck?

In The Village Effect: How Face-to-Face Contact Can Make Us Healthier, Happier and Smarter, Montreal psychologist Susan Pinker cited a 2010 study conducted at Brigham Young University in Idaho that analyzed relationship data for more than 300,000 people over nearly eight years. She discovered that people who were integrated into their communities had half the risk of dying during that time as those who led more solitary lives. In Pinker’s analysis, integration meant simple interactions such as exchanging baked goods, babysitting, borrowing tools, and spur-of-the-moment visits — exactly the kinds of exchanges we saw grow when COVID-19 forced us all to stay home.

For this year’s real estate feature in the Spring/Summer 2020 print edition, we crunched the numbers to find the neighbourhoods where we think you’re most likely to find such opportunities for engagement. Using data available through the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study (ONS), we chose six indicators that we believed would attract those looking to connect with the people around them. Omitting rural areas, we awarded points to each neighbourhood according to where it landed in the ranking. (In the event of a tie, we used a secondary indicator of the same theme to refine the ranking.) You’ll find the ten neighbourhoods that performed the best according to those six indicators listed below, along with resident profiles and notable destinations in each ’hood — though many have been forced to adapt to COVID-19, most are offering delivery and/or take-out, and we are hopeful they will resume normal operations once it is safe to do so.

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