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Two Ontario pot shops appear to be violating building code and accessibility laws

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Toronto’s only licensed, up-and-running, brick-and-mortar cannabis store was open for business on April 1. But some customers with disabilities encountered difficulties when attempting to access the Hunny Pot Cannabis Co. near Queen Street West and University Avenue—there was no ramp to facilitate access for users of mobility devices such as wheelchairs and walkers.

Global News reports that Jordan Dragiz went to the Hunny Pot on Monday to pick up a few cannabis products. After a long wait in line, Dragiz arrived at the front–only to realize that there was no ramp to the front door. In order to be served, Dragiz was forced to leave his wheelchair sitting on the sidewalk and had to be brought in and out of the shop without the device, via staff assistance.

“I wasn’t shocked. I was kind of expecting this. But I wasn’t sure if there’s going to be a ramp or not. I’m more shocked they don’t have a ramp,” Dragiz told Global News. “All these buildings are pretty old … I was wondering what I was going to do, how I was going to get in. But good thing they were nice enough to help me in.”

Staff at the Hunny Pot Cannabis Co. went on the defensive when asked by Global News to explain the lack of accessibility.

“We fully accommodated those individuals. Today, up to four individuals came through with accessibility needs including wheelchair and each were able to purchase product,” Kate Johnny informed Global News in a statement on Monday night. Johnny added that the shop’s owner is working with consultants to identify and correct accessibility issues.

“We do have a temporary ramp that we can bring in to let them come into the store and the ability for our budtenders to bring the point-of-sale and products directly to the individual who currently cannot access the third and fourth floor retail spaces,” says Johnny.

Global reports that upon attending the store on Monday to view the temporary ramp, a rep informed them that the store could not display the ramp due to the influx of clients.

The Hunny Pot Cannabis Co. appears to be in violation of the Ontario Building Code and accessibility laws.

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Ottawa’s Fire & Flower is also currently inaccessible to potential clients with mobility issues. Wayne Cuddington/ Postmedia

“I can tell you that all businesses need to adhere to the Ontario Building Code, which says that any new or considerably renovated building needs to be accessible for people with disabilities,” Minister for Seniors and Accessibility Raymond Cho said in a statement.

“I am reviewing the matter immediately and will be working very closely with my colleague, the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing, as well as my other colleagues who are engaged on this issue on ensuring that we take a full government approach to accessibility.”

Hunny Pot is not the only Ontario dispensary catching criticism for a lack of accessibility. Ottawa’s Fire & Flower is also currently inaccessible to potential clients with mobility issues, although Ottawans have other options at their disposal that are accessible such as Hobo and Superette.

Global reports Fire & Flower spokesperson Nathan Mison says that a “wheelchair ramp, a chair lift, a wider front doorway and wider hallways” were originally planned as part of the store. Because the shop is located in a heritage building, he says, any major renovations would require municipal approval.

As a result, plans to make the store accessible to all clients had to be delayed in order to open by April 1. Because of that, and the tight timeline the company faced before opening day, plans to make the building fully accessible had to be delayed, says Mison, who claims Fire & Flower is working with the city of Ottawa and hopes to have changes implemented over the next few months.

“It’s still in process and we’re still working that through,” he said.

It is unclear whether Hunny Pot or Fire & Flower will face repercussions for flouting provincial disability laws.

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Record one million job losses in March: StatCan

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OTTAWA — More than one million Canadians lost their jobs in the month of March, Statistics Canada is reporting. The unemployment rate has also climbed to 7.8 per cent, up from 2.2 percentage points since February.

Canada’s national statistics agency released its monthly Labour Force Survey on Thursday, using March 15 to 21 as the sample week – a time when the government began enforcing strict guidelines around social gatherings and called on non-essential businesses to close up shop.

The first snapshot of job loss since COVID-19 began taking a toll on the Canadian economy shows 1.1 million out of work since the prior sample period and a consequent decrease in the employment rate – the lowest since April 1997. The most job losses occurred in the private sector and among people aged 15-24.

The number of people who were unemployed increased by 413,000, resulting in the largest one-month increase in Canada’s unemployment rate on record and takes the economy back to a state last seen in October, 2010.

“Almost all of the increase in unemployment was due to temporary layoffs, meaning that workers expected to return to their job within six months,” reads the findings.

The agency included three new indicators, on top of the usual criteria, to better reflect the impact of COVID-19 on employment across the country.

The survey, for example, excludes the more commonly observed reasons for absent workers — such as vacation, weather, parental leave or a strike or lockout — to better isolate the pandemic’s effect.

They looked at: people who are employed but were out of a job during the reference week, people who are employed but worked less than half their usual hours, and people who are unemployed but would like a job.

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Employee at Ottawa’s Amazon Fulfillment Centre tests positive for COVID-19

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OTTAWA — An employee who works at Amazon’s fulfillment centre on Boundary Road in Ottawa’s east-end has tested positive for COVID-19.

Amazon says it learned on April 3 that an associate tested positive for novel coronavirus and is currently in isolation. The employee last worked at the fulfillment centre on March 19.

Two employees told CTV News Ottawa that management informed all employees about the positive test in a text message over the weekend.

In a statement to CTV News Ottawa, Amazon spokesperson Jen Crowcroft wrote “we are supporting the individual who is recovering. We are following guidelines from health officials and medical experts, and are taking extreme measures to ensure the safety of employees at our site.”

The statement also says that Amazon has taken steps to further protect their employees.

“We have also implemented proactive measures at our facilities to protect employees including increased cleaning at all facilities, maintaining social distance in the FC.”

CTV News Ottawa asked Amazon about the timeline between when the company found out about the positive COVID-19 case and when employees were notified.

In a separate email to CTV News Ottawa, Crowcroft said “all associates of our Boundary Road fulfillment centre in Ottawa were notified within 24 hours of learning of the positive COVID-19 case.”

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Ottawa facing silent spring as festivals, events cancelled

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This is shaping up to be Ottawa’s silent spring — and summer’s sounding pretty bleak, too — as more and more concerts, festivals and other annual events are cancelled in the wake of measures meant to slow the spread of coronavirus.

The province has already banned gatherings of more than five people, and on Monday officials announced city parks, facilities and services will remain shut down until the end of June, nor will any event permits be issued until at least that time.

“This leaves us with no choice but to cancel the festival this year,” Ottawa Jazz Festival artistic director Petr Cancura confirmed Monday.

This was to be the festival’s 40th anniversary, and organizers announced the lineup for the June 19-July 1 event the day after Ottawa’s first confirmed case of COVID-19. 

The Toronto and Montreal jazz festivals had already pulled the plug because of similar restrictions in their cities, so Cancura said the writing was on the wall.

“We have a few contingency plans to keep connecting with our audience and working with our artists,” Cancura said.

People holding tickets to the 2020 festival can ask for a refund or exchange for a 2021 pass.

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