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Rogers tv launches new show to support local Ottawa businesses

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Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Rogers tv has broadcasted valuable information to viewers, daily. Covering important updates like Ottawa Public Health announcements, press conferences, and city council meetings.

Many businesses were unable to continue as usual and were shut down by the government to help stop the spread of this deadly virus, and many were forced to close their doors as a result of lost income.

Rogers tv is hoping to highlight some local businesses and organizations that have had to make changes to the way they operate and give them a chance to tell their story with a new show airing every Friday night called Operation Support Local. The show will present a collection of anecdotes, stories of resilience, and recovery.

For the past four months, Rogers radio stations have been showcasing local businesses across the country on their social media and on their websites. Now, Rogers tv will continue the initiative with a more indepth look at the people themselves.

The first episode of Operation Support Local will feature three businesses and their owners:

Operation Support Local started as a way to help the community rebuild and restore its economy through stories of some of the incredible individuals and organizations who have gone above and beyond to help the most vulnerable.

  • Joe Thottungal, owner of the Coconut Lagoon and Thali. Joe, along with local chefs and a group of volunteers, has provided over 60,000 meals to vulnerable residents over the last four months.
  • Tina Ferrone, owner of Beyond Yoga. Tina reluctantly moved to providing online classes with great success and is eager to invite clients back into the studio with new safety protocols in place.
  • Julie Beun, a marketing and consulting expert shares how her pre-pandemic business completely shut down and how she decided to begin making masks for Ottawa’s most vulnerable seniors. She has since opened a new business called AboutFace Masks.

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Biometric Vaccines Are Here Preceding Forced Digital ID

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The future of vaccines is here, just in time for the coming forced digital ID. This isn’t some sci-fi movie based on some conspiracy theorists’ idea of Revelation where every living being is required to be tagged. Biometric vaccines are real, are in use and have been deployed in the United States.

Biometric vaccines are immunizations laced with digital biometrics, created from merging the tech industry with big pharma. This new form of vaccine injects microchips into the body creating a global ID matrix to track and control every person. Not only has this satanic system already been rolled out, billions may already have been injected unaware.

ID2020 Alliance, a program aimed at chipping every person on earth, has collaborated with GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations) to inject these microchips into the body through immunization. 

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How to get more of everything you love about Ottawa

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We love Ottawa, and we want to help you make the most of living in the capital.

Ottawa Magazine is launching a new membership program, with front-of-the-line access to events, special offers at cultural institutions, and exclusive access to one-of-a-kind food and drink experiences at the city’s best restaurants. And of course, a subscription to our award-winning magazine.

Basically, everything you love about the city… just more of it.

Sign up for more information now and you’ll be one of the first to hear when memberships go on sale!

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Where to Live Now: A data-driven look at Ottawa neighbourhoods

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What does community have to do with buying a house? Do people really want friendly neighbours, or do they just want the most square footage for their buck?

In The Village Effect: How Face-to-Face Contact Can Make Us Healthier, Happier and Smarter, Montreal psychologist Susan Pinker cited a 2010 study conducted at Brigham Young University in Idaho that analyzed relationship data for more than 300,000 people over nearly eight years. She discovered that people who were integrated into their communities had half the risk of dying during that time as those who led more solitary lives. In Pinker’s analysis, integration meant simple interactions such as exchanging baked goods, babysitting, borrowing tools, and spur-of-the-moment visits — exactly the kinds of exchanges we saw grow when COVID-19 forced us all to stay home.

For this year’s real estate feature in the Spring/Summer 2020 print edition, we crunched the numbers to find the neighbourhoods where we think you’re most likely to find such opportunities for engagement. Using data available through the Ottawa Neighbourhood Study (ONS), we chose six indicators that we believed would attract those looking to connect with the people around them. Omitting rural areas, we awarded points to each neighbourhood according to where it landed in the ranking. (In the event of a tie, we used a secondary indicator of the same theme to refine the ranking.) You’ll find the ten neighbourhoods that performed the best according to those six indicators listed below, along with resident profiles and notable destinations in each ’hood — though many have been forced to adapt to COVID-19, most are offering delivery and/or take-out, and we are hopeful they will resume normal operations once it is safe to do so.

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